Pronounciation of Wiener

  • Thread starter rsq_a
  • Start date
  • #1
107
1
Sorry for the rather abrupt question, but how does one pronounce "Wiener", as in Norbert Wiener?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norbert_Wiener

Does it sound like "Viner"?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Math Is Hard
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
4,566
34
tee hee heee hee

sorry :redface:
 
  • #3
1,426
1
How is this question abrupt? What sequence is it rupturing?
 
  • #4
Moonbear
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
11,558
53
Well, I'd pronounce it "wee-ner" but if he pronounces it with the Polish pronunciation of his father's ancestry rather than with an American accent, it might be more like "vee-ner" but short and chopped rather than long and drawled out.
 
  • #5
85
166
Did der veenersnitzle come from Poland ? :devil:
 
  • #6
187
1
It wouldn't be Wine-er? *shrug*
 
  • #7
Moonbear
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
11,558
53
Did der veenersnitzle come from Poland ? :devil:

The wiki article cited says his father was Polish and mother German, so I'm assuming his last name would have picked up his father's pronunciation, not his mother's.
 
  • #8
mgb_phys
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
7,819
15
In German you pronounce the second letter of 'ie' or 'ei'
 
  • #9
187
1
In German you pronounce the second letter of 'ie' or 'ei'

Learn something new every day.

I just wish it was something more substantial, but I'll take what I can get. :-p
 
  • #10
f95toli
Science Advisor
Gold Member
3,320
821
The wiki article cited says his father was Polish and mother German, so I'm assuming his last name would have picked up his father's pronunciation, not his mother's.

But the article also says that his father was Polish-Jewish and many Jewish names tend to be pronounced using German (well, Yiddish) pronunciation regardless of the country of origin.
Just think of all the Russian-Jewish scientist (Lifgarbagez and Landau comes to mind), you don't use Russian pronunciation for their names.
 
Last edited:
  • #11
81
0
As Moonbear said, "wee-ner" is the correct pronounciation. I'm of German descent, I should know...:wink:
 
  • #12
OmCheeto
Gold Member
2,212
2,667
As Moonbear said, "wee-ner" is the correct pronounciation. I'm of German descent, I should know...:wink:

My mother vas from Germany, on the Polish side of the border now. A German would properly pronounce it "Vee-ner", as Moonbear also stated.

Now if you are from Michigan, it's obviously pronounced "wee-ner", as proven by the following video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/HUJ4es4cYIU&hl=en&fs=1"></param><param [Broken] name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/HUJ4es4cYIU&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #13
4,488
73
My mother vas from Germany, on the Polish side of the border now. A German would properly pronounce it "Vee-ner", as Moonbear also stated.

Nice try Om, :biggrin: but no, the mix up is likely because the city of Wien is also known as Vienna.

But it's ween, listen carefully to German mother tongues (Deutcher Mutter Zunge):

Cs1jgQJ5OQU[/youtube] [url]nONboKmXg20[/youtube]
 
Last edited:
  • #14
OmCheeto
Gold Member
2,212
2,667
Nice try Om, :biggrin: but no, the mix up is likely because the city of Wien is also known as Vienna.

But it's ween, listen carefully to German mother tongues (Deutcher Mutter Zunge):


Thank you Andre. As my mother would say, you have made this so klar wie dicke Tinte. :rolleyes:
 
  • #15
107
1
Boy, I didn't expect this to be a debate.

It seems most people here either agreed upon 'veener' or 'weener'

I just found this site:
http://www.waukesha.uwc.edu/mat/kkromare/main.html [Broken]

According to the site, the correct pronunciation is 'vee nuhr'. I've no idea whether it's right. But some of the pronunciations of other obscure mathematicians seems correct (in particular, I asked for the pronunciation of 'Stieltjes' a few months ago).
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #16
4,488
73
Boy, I didn't expect this to be a debate.

It seems most people here either agreed upon 'veener' or 'weener'

I just found this site:
http://www.waukesha.uwc.edu/mat/kkromare/main.html [Broken]

According to the site, the correct pronunciation is 'vee nuhr'. I've no idea whether it's right. But some of the pronunciations of other obscure mathematicians seems correct (in particular, I asked for the pronunciation of 'Stieltjes' a few months ago).

It seems that that this site lives on a parallel word where all german "W" are pronounced as "V". Now let it be known that both German and English are Germanic languages and hence closely related. And as such, consonants are pronounced basically in the same way.

So if this mathematical expression thing wants to impose the German W as V, it has probably more to do with cultivating subculture and slang than reality and

Wilhelm Weber 1804-91 'vay buhr
Nope (in real life): Way buhr

Karl Weierstrass 1815-97 'vi uhr shtrass
Nope: (in real life) Why uhr shtrah ss
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #17
Math Is Hard
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
4,566
34
Nope (in real life): Way buhr

Interesting.

He was called "Vey-bur" where I studied, although a few insisted on "Webber".
 
  • #18
107
1
Nope: (in real life) Why uhr shtrah ss

I've never heard it (at two schools in two different countries) pronounced with a W and not a V.
 
  • #19
81
0
Here you go:

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/wiener" [Broken]
:wink:
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #20
4,488
73
I've never heard it (at two schools in two different countries) pronounced with a W and not a V.

Well, we have just witnessed the mutilation of wiener, caught red handed, would you believe from somebody who spent years in Germany that Germans pronounce ALL W's as W and not as V?
 
  • #21
tiny-tim
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
25,836
254
  • #22
359
0
Well, we have just witnessed the mutilation of wiener, caught red handed, would you believe from somebody who spent years in Germany that Germans pronounce ALL W's as W and not as V?

which part of germany did you stay in? are you talking about the Hochdeutsch (High German) version or a dialect version. Inhabitants of Hannover, for example, speak the closest form of Hochdeutsch (IIRC) whereas Schwaben speak, well, Schwäbisch. All with very very different pronunciations and grammar btw.

Personally, I would go for the Vaynuhr (maybe closer to Veigh-nuhr, but that would be from the plattdeutsch that I was surrounded by during my stay in Germany) pronunciation. But, it would probably be easier to look in you phone book or web directory, find someone of that name and ask them how they pronounce it :wink:
 
  • #23
359
0
It seems that that this site lives on a parallel word where all german "W" are pronounced as "V". Now let it be known that both German and English are Germanic languages and hence closely related. And as such, consonants are pronounced basically in the same way.

I disagree:

English
v - vee as in very, vile
w - wa as in water, well
z - z as in buzz, zoom
s - s as in sail, sick

German (with english pronunciations)
v - f (vor -> for)
W - v (weiter -> veigh-ter)
z - ts (zu -> tsu)
s - z (sieben -> zee-ben)
q - ku
 
  • #24
jtbell
Mentor
15,866
4,463
It seems that that this site lives on a parallel word where all german "W" are pronounced as "V". Now let it be known that both German and English are Germanic languages and hence closely related. And as such, consonants are pronounced basically in the same way.

I've studied German in high school and college, and have visited Germany several times. My wife has a Ph.D. in German and teaches it. I've never heard of German 'w' being pronounced like English 'w', always as English 'v', except in German names that have been Anglicized by immigrants in English-speaking countries, and that practice isn't universal.
 
  • #25
4,488
73
I am reallyflabbergasted. But it's probably my Dutch native tongue

Now here is the prononciation as I remember it for the last oh 56 years or so, regardless if it comes from Bayern, Preusen, Nord Rhein Westfalen, Sasken

Here you go:

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/wiener" [Broken]
:wink:

Now if that sounds like a "V", that would explain everything, but to for my ears it's the purest "W" I ever heard.

Also are these native tongues wrong? Have they no idea how to pronounce their own "Wien"?

Cs1jgQJ5OQU[/youtube] [url]nONboKmXg20[/youtube][/QUOTE]
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #26
lisab
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,955
620
Here you go:

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/wiener" [Broken]
:wink:

I hear a "W", no trace of a "V".
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #27
wolram
Gold Member
Dearly Missed
4,330
559
LITTLE DICK, sorry
 
  • #28
4,488
73
I hear a "W", no trace of a "V".

Thanks, Lisa, I needed the reality check. I really wonder what the origin is of the W=V myth. First of all, I seem to observe that there is a minute difference in pronounciation of the English and the German W. In English one starts of with a rounded mouth as if one intends to say Ooh, but the moment the word starts, the mouth is quickly widened, so there is a hint of a Oo before the W, oo-water, pronounced slow and gently . Germans do not announce the w with an ooh. It's there straight away, no initial rounding of the lips: wasser. pronounced quick and staccato

So perhaps it might be this tiny difference that the English have the impression that the German W is a V. However there is a clear distinction with the real German V as in Vater, Vektor, Vergangenheit, viel, und so weiter.

Alternately it could have been Hollywood where it was decided perhaps that some nutty professor mutulated the language by making V out of W's (Vot?). So obviously science thought it should pick it up by banning the W altogether.

However the Germans are completely unaware of these Anglosaksian complications and continue to happily talk with W for Wasserfall, Weiss, Wochenende, Wunderbar und so weiter.
 
  • #29
Math Is Hard
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
4,566
34
Oh, and thanks, Andre. I can't get Wiener Blut out of my head now. :grumpy:
 
  • #30
4,488
73
Sorry MiH :yuck: Perhaps try this German exercise in pronouncing W's for antidote

9htxzB9veLI[/youtube]
 

Related Threads on Pronounciation of Wiener

Replies
8
Views
6K
P
  • Last Post
Replies
12
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
10
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
15
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
19
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
13
Views
8K
  • Last Post
Replies
11
Views
10K
Replies
55
Views
5K
Replies
6
Views
247
Replies
4
Views
2K
Top