Raw foods and other nature stuff

  • Thread starter SF
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Nature
In summary, raw foods and other nature-related products have gained popularity due to their potential health benefits and environmental friendliness. Raw foods are uncooked, unprocessed, and typically plant-based, with the belief that cooking kills essential nutrients. Other nature-based products, such as herbal remedies and natural beauty products, have also gained popularity as people seek alternatives to synthetic and chemically-laden products. However, there is a lack of scientific evidence to support the claims of raw food and other nature-based products, and they may also pose health risks if not properly prepared or used. Overall, while incorporating more raw and natural products into one's lifestyle can have potential benefits, it is important to do so in moderation and with proper research.
  • #1
SF
Raw foods and other "nature" stuff

A friend of mine rejects boiled vegetables, as he sais all the nutrients are destroyed.
I hold that only some of the nutrients are destroyed and there isn't much difference between eating boiled and unboiled stuff.

What's lost in the process can be obtained from other aliments.
Who's right?
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Biology news on Phys.org
  • #2
Some are lost not all, especially if you stir fry or par boil. In particular vitamin C loses out quite substantially, but the other vitamins are a little more resilient, so much of them remain, if they didn't then cooking food would leave us with sever vitamin deficiencies.

So yeah your friend is wrong.

You might like to know that the majority of vitamin C in the West is more commonly obtained from eating potatoes, it's the sheer amount. And when was the last time you ate a raw spud?
 
  • #3
Some of the nutrients are lost, yeah, but a much larger portion of the bacteria that are present in the vegetable are destroyed too. Which is one of the trade-offs on cooking food; lose some of the healthy stuff, but kill a lot more of the unhealthy stuff.
 
  • #4
There is some fog here. You can kill bacteria by washing. If there are pathogenic bacteria inside vegetable tissues something is seriously wrong with the food supply. Yes high tempartures do kill bacteria, but they should have been removed or been pretty much absent to start with.

Next, digestibility of vegetables increases enormously when they are cooked. Almost all vitamins can be lost - to a lesser or greater degree during cooking. However the availability of nutrients increases. That's what digestibility means.
 
  • #5
Don't forget that, independent of chemical destruction of nutrients, there is also physical removal of those nutrients. The boiling process ruptures the cells, and much of that yummy goodness is lost into the water. The water may or may not be consumed.
 
  • #6
I understand the antioxident properties Of tomatoes are greatly increased by eating them cooked. Pasta sauce is better than sliced tomatoes.
 
  • #7
There are some conflicting ideas presented here (or at least a few differences of opinion...destruction of nutrients, leeching of nutrients into the water, enhanced digestibility of the remaining nutrients, improvement of other nutrient properties...). I'd like to ask folks to provide some sources to back up claims. I think that will help SF to best explain this to his friend too by backing it up with some solid sources. I just want to be sure we're not all spreading some common misconceptions (I don't know...I just have heard such debates without sources before, so am not sure how much of what we "know" on this topic is based in science and how much is what we "heard somewhere.") I'm sure nutrition and food scientists have studied such questions, and sources must be available to provide good answers.
 
  • #8
I can post proof of the nutritional differences in cooking breaking down cells that allow nutrients to be absorbed as in the case of collard greens, an excellent example, but I can't access the website from home, they have an error in their scipting that conflicts with my browser version.

Something not brought up is the combination of foods, for example, most people think spinach is an excellent source of iron, not so. The naturally occurring oxalic acid prevents absorbtion of the iron, as does eating milk products. That spinach dip you think is healthy? Think again.

Certain factors influence the amount of iron absorbed from food. The iron in meat, fish and poultry is absorbed better than plant sources. Vitamin C can enhance the amount of iron absorbed in a meatless meal. Including vitamin C rich foods, such as fruits and leafy green vegetables in your meals, is a good way to promote iron absorption. Certain compounds in foods may slightly decrease iron absorptions, such as oxalic acid in spinach, phosphates in milk and egg whites, phytates in beans and other vegetables, and possibly the tannins in tea. Calcium supplements also may decrease iron absorption, so avoid taking them with iron-rich foods

http://health.rutgers.edu/factsheets/iron.htm

Although not a scientific study, this article will give some background, which can be further researched, into why cooking food is often beneficial and how certain foods eaten together can be beneficial or non-beneficial.

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpa...2C1A962948260&sec=health&spon=&pagewanted=all
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #11
According to this study, many cooked vegetables offer higher availability of nutrients.
Cooked vegetables give you considerably more protection against heart disease and cancer than raw ones, according to a ...European research team. Cooking softens up plant cells, improving gut absorption of carotenoids—antioxidants that combat tissue damage and the accumulation of plaque in arteries.

They noted that the carotenoids in cooked & mashed carrots are absorbed 5X more, compared to eating them raw. Beta-carotene is high, not only in carrots but also spinach, broccoli and collards. Another carotenoid, lycopene (found in tomato and watermelon) is also very stable after cooking.
 
  • #12
Please tell me that I was right about vitamin C at least. :biggrin:
 
  • #13
Ouabache said:
According to this study, many cooked vegetables offer higher availability of nutrients.


They noted that the carotenoids in cooked & mashed carrots are absorbed 5X more, compared to eating them raw. Beta-carotene is high, not only in carrots but also spinach, broccoli and collards. Another carotenoid, lycopene (found in tomato and watermelon) is also very stable after cooking.

But who wants to eat cooked watermelon??
 
  • #14
cooked watermelon

DaveC426913 said:
But who wants to eat cooked watermelon??
I've seen folks from China, stir-frying the rind. I would venture there is lycopene in the rind.
"In China, they are stir-fried, stewed, or more often pickled. When stir-fried, the de-skinned and de-fruited rind is cooked with olive oil, garlic, chili peppers, scallions, sugar and rum" ref1Schrodinger's Dog, yes Vitamin C is heat labile. Some will be lost during cooking. (http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/5000/5552.html )
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Related to Raw foods and other nature stuff

What is the definition of "raw foods"?

Raw foods are foods that have not been cooked or processed in any way. They are consumed in their natural state, typically in the form of fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and grains.

What are the benefits of eating raw foods?

Eating raw foods provides a variety of health benefits, including increased intake of vitamins, minerals, and enzymes. Raw foods are also rich in fiber and antioxidants, which can aid in digestion and help prevent chronic diseases.

Are there any risks associated with consuming raw foods?

Yes, there are some risks associated with consuming raw foods. Raw foods may contain harmful bacteria and parasites that can cause foodborne illnesses. It is important to properly wash and prepare raw foods before consuming them.

What is the difference between raw and organic foods?

Raw foods refer to the state of the food, while organic foods refer to how the food was grown or produced. Raw foods can be either organic or non-organic. Organic foods are grown without the use of synthetic pesticides, fertilizers, or genetically modified organisms.

What other "nature stuff" is beneficial for our health?

In addition to raw foods, other nature-based practices such as outdoor exercise, spending time in nature, and using natural remedies have been shown to have positive effects on physical and mental health. These practices can help reduce stress, improve mood, and boost the immune system.

Similar threads

  • General Discussion
Replies
1
Views
785
Replies
3
Views
5K
Replies
9
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
14
Views
3K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • General Discussion
Replies
24
Views
1K
Replies
1
Views
4K
  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
13
Views
2K
  • Set Theory, Logic, Probability, Statistics
Replies
9
Views
2K
  • Quantum Interpretations and Foundations
Replies
25
Views
2K
Back
Top