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References for quantum chromodynamics

  1. Aug 20, 2008 #1
    Hey all,

    I am currently in a 300 level physics class, Concepts of Modern Physics, and as a semester project we are required to research a topic and do a presentation. I chose QCD because I have done some reading on it and it seemed the most interesting on the list. Although, i would like to have a few more references than what I have right now. Can anyone help point me in the right direction for some information on this topic. Thanks!!

    Kev
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 21, 2008 #2

    malawi_glenn

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  4. Aug 21, 2008 #3

    Vanadium 50

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    THE area to start is the CTEQ Meta-Page at http://www.phys.psu.edu/~cteq/

    I recommend the handbook of perturbative QCD (linked on that page) highly.
     
  5. Aug 21, 2008 #4

    malawi_glenn

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    Vanadium, I think that is too advanced for the OP :-)
     
  6. Aug 21, 2008 #5

    Vanadium 50

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    Maybe, maybe not. Depends on what the "some reading" entails.
     
  7. Aug 21, 2008 #6
    Try "Constructing Quarks" by Andrew Pickering. Do scientists uncover truth or create it out of their experiments and theories?

    http://www.huss.ex.ac.uk/sociology/staff/pickering/biog.php

    Sheesh! Pickering has two PhD's, one in particle physics, the other in the sociology of particle physicists. Gribbin uses his ideas the focus for his "Kittens" book if you want a lighter intro.
     
  8. Aug 21, 2008 #7
    ... but check out critics of Pickering like Weinberg ("Dreams...") to get both sides!
     
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