Revisiting an old Math Problem

  • Thread starter manuelsmarin
  • Start date
In summary, A person is requesting for someone to check an attached file that involves high school algebra. Another person responds with a summary of a paper that they read, pointing out their issue with the language used. The conversation then shifts to a different topic, with a new member asking for clarification on a specific step in a proof. The original person responds by pointing out where the information can be found and clarifying that personal theories are not allowed in the forum.
  • #1
Would someone check the attached file? It's simple high school algebra.
 

Attachments

  • Fermat3_pdf.pdf
    563.4 KB · Views: 314
Mathematics news on Phys.org
  • #2
manuelsmarin said:
Would someone check the attached file? It's simple high school algebra.



I just read the very first few lines, as it seems to be one more simple ""proof"" of Fermat's last Theorem or something of

the kind. The language used is sloppy, and where it begins with that nonsense of
[tex]\text{if}\,\,A+B=C+D\,\,\text{and}\,\,A=C\,\,,\, \text{then} \,\,B=D[/tex]
which is so boringly obvious that it shouldn't even appear in a paper trying to prove "a very important theorem of mathematics"

DonAntonio
 
  • #3
Are you the only member of this forum? You're such a bully...
 
  • #4
manuelsmarin said:
Are you the only member of this forum? You're such a bully...


"Bully"? Were you expecting me, or anyone else, to write your opinion on this, or you'd rather have my own opinion?

Well, perhaps other members of the forum have different opinions. Good luck with that.

DonAntonio
 
  • #5
DonAntonio: I can't find where he says what you say he says. Can you please point out the page and the phrase that was used?
 
  • #6
Hi manuelsmarin and welcome to the forums.

Can you please explain in more detail step [8] of the general proof for n > 2? I get all the identities including step 9 used for later steps (i.e. 10 and greater) but not that one. What assumptions have you made?
 
  • #7
chiro said:
DonAntonio: I can't find where he says what you say he says. Can you please point out the page and the phrase that was used?

Page 2, Test For Equality Theorem
IF ##(x-y+z)=(u+w)## AND either ##(x-y)=u## or ##(x-y)=w##, THEN, in the first case, ##z=w## or, in the second case, ##z=u##.
 
  • #8
Personal theories are not allowed in this forum.
 

1. What is the purpose of revisiting an old math problem?

Revisiting an old math problem allows for a deeper understanding of the concepts involved and can help to solidify knowledge and skills.

2. How do you approach revisiting an old math problem?

The first step is to review the problem and any previous work or notes. Then, try to solve the problem using a different method or approach. This will help to expand your problem-solving abilities.

3. What should I do if I still can't solve the problem after revisiting it?

If you are still struggling with the problem, it may be helpful to seek assistance from a teacher, tutor, or peer. They may offer a different perspective or explain the concept in a way that clicks with you.

4. Is it necessary to revisit old math problems if I already understand the concept?

Revisiting old math problems is not necessary, but it can be beneficial in solidifying your understanding and improving problem-solving skills.

5. How often should I revisit old math problems?

There is no set frequency for revisiting old math problems. It can be helpful to revisit them periodically, especially if you are struggling with a particular concept or if you want to improve your problem-solving skills.

Suggested for: Revisiting an old Math Problem

Replies
7
Views
658
Replies
72
Views
4K
Replies
4
Views
468
Replies
2
Views
674
Replies
1
Views
561
Replies
31
Views
3K
Replies
4
Views
858
Back
Top