Rigorous treatments of double-slit , quantum eraser, etc.

In summary, the conversation discusses the use of a quantum mechanics approach to derive single, double, and multiple slits patterns without relying on classical wave optics. The paper by Marcella and Rioux's treatment are mentioned as resources for further understanding. The Fourier transform method is also mentioned as a potential alternative method. The topic of the quantum eraser and its relation to these techniques is also briefly mentioned.
  • #1
strangerep
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From a recent double-slit thread:

ZapperZ said:
Check the "[URL
Marcella paper[/URL] that I've cited numerous times to see how
you derive single, double, and multiple slits pattern using QM
without invoking classical wave optics.

In fact, one can even extend this approach into 2D as well without invoking
classical optics. See Frank Rioux treatment of
http://www.users.csbsju.edu/~frioux/diffraction/ej33n1.pdf" .

Thank you for mentioning those papers! (Probably, I didn't notice the earlier
mentions because I hardly ever read the endless "double-slit" threads. :-)

The Fourier transform method occurred to me a while back as possibly
a better way of deriving this stuff (less handwaving and less reliance
on interpretations), but I never found time to work it out fully. It's
good that Marcella has done this.

BTW, are there any treatments of the quantum eraser that extend
such techniques to that setup?

Cheers.
 
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  • #3
Greg Bernhardt said:
@strangerep did you find any more insight on this topic?
I don't think it's needed. You might as well this thread, since Zz already mentioned the Marcella and Rioux papers elsewhere.
 
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Likes Greg Bernhardt

1. What is the double-slit experiment and why is it important in quantum physics?

The double-slit experiment is a fundamental experiment in quantum physics that demonstrates the wave-particle duality of matter. It involves shining a beam of particles, such as electrons or photons, through two parallel slits and observing the resulting interference pattern on a screen. This experiment is important because it provides evidence for the probabilistic nature of quantum particles and challenges our understanding of classical physics.

2. What is a quantum eraser and how does it work?

A quantum eraser is a thought experiment that demonstrates the concept of quantum entanglement, where two particles become linked and share a correlated state. In this experiment, a particle is split into two entangled particles, one of which passes through a double-slit and the other is measured. The measurement of the second particle determines which slit the first particle passed through, erasing any interference pattern. This experiment shows that the act of observing or measuring a particle can affect its behavior.

3. What is the difference between a classical and quantum system?

In classical physics, systems are deterministic, meaning that their behavior can be predicted with certainty. In contrast, quantum systems are probabilistic, meaning that their behavior can only be described by the likelihood of different outcomes. Additionally, classical systems follow the laws of classical mechanics, while quantum systems follow the laws of quantum mechanics, which include concepts such as wave-particle duality and uncertainty.

4. How does the double-slit experiment support the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics?

The Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics states that particles do not have a definite state until they are observed or measured. The double-slit experiment supports this interpretation because the interference pattern observed on the screen only appears when the particles are not being observed. This suggests that the particles exist in a superposition of states, with their wave-like behavior only collapsing into a definite state upon observation.

5. Can the results of the double-slit experiment be explained by any other theories besides quantum mechanics?

No, the results of the double-slit experiment are unique to quantum mechanics and cannot be explained by any classical or macroscopic theories. This experiment has been repeated numerous times with various particles and always produces the same results, providing strong evidence for the validity of quantum mechanics.

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