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Science poetry-or verse that is just informative about nature

  1. Oct 2, 2008 #1

    marcus

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    Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    In another thread, Mormonator mentioned poetry about particle physics. This reminds me of John Updike's Neutrino poem and Franck Wilczek's Virtual Particles sonnet.
    And Borges sonnet about 4D spacetime. Maybe we should try collecting some samples of poetry about science and about the deeper vision of nature which it provides.

    the two are different. science is a human activity, a tradition, a community with customs and standards etc. one could have verse about scientists and about that activity.

    but the vision that science helps us get is something else. it's different from the activity of science and more emotional. Feynman talked about enjoying a sunset and at the same time understanding what underlies the colors. or enjoying both the blue sky along with understanding why the sky is blue--how the air can preferentially scatter blue light more than red. being at the beach watching the waves and also thinking the molecules of water. that isn't so much science as an extension of a love of nature. or the knowledge of cosmology that deepens appreciation of the night sky.

    so where are the poems about this? they are rare, I guess. there is not very much science verse of any kind, and what there is is mostly LIGHT verse----witty humor. So let's collect whatever we can find and not be picky! Light verse is fine---it teaches something too. Here's an example by Frank Wilczek:


    VIRTUAL PARTICLES, by Frank Wilczek

    Beware of thinking nothing's there.
    Remove all you can, despite your care
    Behind remains a restless seething
    Of mindless clones beyond conceiving.

    They come in a wink, they dance about,
    Whatever they touch is seized by doubt:
    What am I doing here? What should I weigh?
    Such thoughts often lead to rapid decay.

    Fear not! The terminology's misleading;
    Decay is virtual particle breeding
    Their ferment, though mindless, does serve noble ends:
    Those clones, when exchanged, make a bond between friends.

    To be or not? The choice seems clear enough,
    But Hamlet vacillated. So does this stuff.


    This sonnet is recited by Wilczek in the online video lecture The Universe is a Strange Place
    to find it go here:
    http://web.mit.edu/physics/facultyandstaff/faculty/frank_wilczek.html
    and scroll down to "View the Lectures" where there is a list of his video lectures
    and also you can find it in his book Fantastic Realities:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/9812566554/


    here's another rhymed verse thread
    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=244079
    it has some other samples of science-related poetry
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2008
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  3. Oct 2, 2008 #2

    marcus

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    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    the best humorous physics poem I know is Cosmic Gall by John Updike, about neutrinos
    this is typed from memory and so you need to consult his Collected Poems at the library
    to be sure of every word and punctuation mark. but this is the gist:

    Neutrinos are of size quite small,
    No charge, and hardly any mass.
    They scarcely interact at all:
    The earth is just a silly ball
    To them, through which they simply pass,
    Like dustmaids down a drafty hall
    Or photons through a sheet of glass.
    They snub the most exquisite gas,
    Ignore the most substantial wall,
    Cold-shoulder steel and sounding brass,
    Insult the stallion in his stall,
    And scorning barriers of class,
    Infiltrate you and me! Like tall
    And painless guillotines, they fall
    Down through our heads into the grass.
    At night, they enter at Nepal
    And pierce the lover and his lass
    From underneath the bed--you call
    It wonderful; I call it crass.

    for more goodies, here's his collected poems
    http://www.amazon.com/Collected-Poems-1953-1993-John-Updike/dp/0679762043
    Updike is remarkable. If I felt qualified to judge I'd call him the most accomplished stylist in America
    based on his short stories and novels, a kind of New Yorker paragon. We are lucky to have
    a physics poem from him---actually he has several but this will do for a sample.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2008
  4. Oct 2, 2008 #3

    marcus

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    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    Frank Wilczek has this quatrain about gluons

    GLUON RAP by Franck Wilczek

    O! O! O! You eight colorful guys!
    You won't let quarks materialize.
    You're tricky, but now we realize
    You hold together our nucleis.

    To find other poems by Wilczek, and to make sure the punctuation is right here, look in his 49 essays book
    called Fantastic Realities
    http://www.amazon.com/Fantastic-Realities-Mind-Journeys-Stockholm/dp/9812566554/

    I guess nucleis is the superplural of nucleus.
    Several would be nuclei, the ordinary plural form,
    but a whole lot more would be nucleis.
    or even nucleizes.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2008
  5. Oct 2, 2008 #4

    wolram

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    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    I love the second one.
     
  6. Oct 2, 2008 #5

    marcus

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    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    Yeah, the one by Updike. He is a master writer and a very smart guy to boot. I'd say you have good taste in poetry :biggrin:.

    I'm hoping a few other people will find physics poems to add on here.
     
  7. Oct 8, 2008 #6
    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    Here is a short haiku I have written that I will share. I was frustrated at the time by my inability to nail down a good mass for the sigma meson in a meson-tetraquark-glueball mixing scheme, and also by the overabundance of spurion and a wide range of experimental data that did not agree well on it either. I don't know if it is very good, but my feelings of frustration were vented this way. So, here it is, titled "Light sigma Meson"

    "Light sigma Meson"

    In the cold snowscape,
    The white rabbit hides secure.
    How you elude me!
     
  8. Oct 8, 2008 #7

    marcus

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    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    This is a prize (surprise) haiku.
    I am not a regular fan of that form--I prefer western rhymed metrical lyric, as a rule.
    But was delighted with this one, because it has the surprise change from serene stillness
    to an impatient outburst
    I think a classic virtue of the haiku form is sudden change, an epigrammatic ambush.

    In yours, a tranquil image is presented as something restful and calming to contemplate
    and then inverted: previously admired blankness is now cause for aggravation.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2008
  9. Oct 8, 2008 #8
    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    I am glad you liked it, marcus. I would also add that my selection of a winter theme was not by chance. Since cold, nonpertrubative QCD is involved, and the process is low energy, I picked a winter theme. The haiku does require a season to be selected, traditionally.
     
  10. Oct 8, 2008 #9

    marcus

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    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    It's interesting how you think multilevel like a poet as well as a particle physicist. If you have some other samples of physics poetry that you think would make a fitting companion to that haiku, please post. It would be nice to see some other work. I like your haiku so I'm going to copy it here to keep it in immediate sight.

     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2008
  11. Oct 13, 2008 #10
    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    Thanks... I try. I do have one other that I find worthy of posting, but it is not any traditional form. It is completely modernistic free verse, technically speaking... I was mostly thinking of the new linear accelerator that will be coming, but also a tribute to linear accelerators in general, so I called it "LINAC" as a general reference to linear accelerators. It is by no means technically accurate (I made this years ago and hadn't been to an accelerator facility yet), but gives a general feeling which is, I think, more important.

    "LINAC"

    Deep underground lays a massive tunnel
    A tube of giant proportion lined with magnets
    Dynamos whir
    Static builds
    Scientists line up in the control room
    To watch the injector readout
    Suddenly the positrons accelerate down the track
    Hurtling toward their impending doom
    While opposite them, the electrons speed onward
    To meet them half-way.
    The beams collide
    As positrons and electrons meet,
    Showering the detectors with photons
    Like a gentle spring mist
    Somewhere within a new breed of particle
    Lurks, hidden and obscured
    Seen only as the presence of charged pions
    Nothing but silence and darkness in the tunnel
    No color except black and no sound
    Except for the whirring dynamos.
    In the control room
    A claxon chimes
    Everyone looks at the monitor
    All falls still and calm except for
    Little green lines on the display
    Little green lines to show where things went
    Like a mess of thin spaghetti all over the screen
    They all congratulate each other on a fine run
    And then go home for the night
    Tomorrow they will learn what happened
    In that silent dark tunnel
     
  12. Apr 16, 2009 #11

    marcus

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    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    A possible source of science-related rhymed metric verse:
    http://www.poemhunter.com/james-clerk-maxwell/poems/page-1/
    James Clerk Maxwell one of the greatest scientists of the 19th C, maybe all time, was also an amateur versifier.

    He has a poem in honor of Arthur Cayley. They were collecting contributions to commission a portrait painter, Dickenson, to do a painting of Cayley for the university collection, so Maxwell wrote:


    To the Committee of the Cayley Portrait Fund

    O wretched race of men, to space confined!
    What honour can ye pay to him, whose mind
    To that which lies beyond hath penetrated?
    The symbols he hath formed shall sound his praise,
    And lead him on through unimagined ways
    To conquests new, in worlds not yet created.

    ...

    March on, symbolic host! with step sublime,
    Up to the flaming bounds of Space and Time!
    There pause, until by Dickenson depicted,
    In two dimensions, we the form may trace
    Of him whose soul, too large for vulgar space,
    In n dimensions flourished unrestricted.

    James Clerk Maxwell
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2009
  13. Apr 16, 2009 #12
    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    Marcus, I just love poetry. It's always a pleasure meeting a man that likes poetry as much as you do. Thank you.:biggrin: I hope you won't mind me placing a poem here about *human nature*.

    I have a fondness for Galway Kinnell since I’m a woman. I’ve had the pleasure of meeting him. This is my favorite poem. Ahhhhh, so loverly.:!!)

    Galway Kinnell, Poetry, “Feathering,” The New Yorker, January 24, 2000, p. 54

    FEATHERING

    Many heads before mine have waked
    in the dark on that old pillow
    and lain there, awake, wondering
    at the strangeness within themselves
    they had been part of, a moment ago.

    She has ripped out the stitches
    at one end and stands on the stone table
    in the garden holding the pillow like a sack
    and plunges her fingers in and extracts
    a thick handful of breast feathers.

    A few of them snow toward the ground,
    and immediately tree swallows appear.
    She raises the arm holding the down
    straight up in the air, and stands there, like a mom

    at a school crossing, or a god
    of seedtime about to release
    a stream of bits of plenitude,
    or herself, long ago at a pond, chumming
    for sunfish with bread crumbs.

    At the lift of a breeze, her fist
    loosens and parcels out a slow
    upward tumble of dozens of puffs
    near zero on the scale of materiality.
    More swallows loop and dive about her.

    Now, with a flap, one picks up speed
    and streaks in at a feather, misses, stops,
    twists and streaks back and this time
    snaps its beak shut on it, and soars,
    and banks back to where its nest box is.

    A few more flurries, and she ties off
    the pillow, ending for today
    the game they make of it when she’s there,
    the imperative to feather one’s nest
    come down from the Pliocene.

    At the window, where I’ve been watching
    through bird glasses, I can see
    a graceful awkwardness in her walk,
    as if she’s tipsy, or not sure
    where she’s been, and yet is deeply happy.

    Sometimes when we’re out at dinner and a dim mood
    from the day persists in me, she flies up and
    disappears a moment, plucking out of the air
    somewhere this or that amusement or comfort
    and, back again, lays it in our dinner talk.

    Once, when it was time to leave, she stood up
    and, scanning about the restaurant for the restroom,
    went up as if on tiptoe, like the upland plover.
    In the taxi we kissed a mint from the desk
    from my mouth to hers, like cedar waxwings.

    Later, when I padded up to bed,
    I found her dropped off, the bedside lamp
    still on, an open book face down over her heart;
    and though my plod felt quiet
    as a cat’s footfalls, her eyes at once opened.

    And when I climbed into our bed and crept
    toward the side of it lined with the down comforter
    and the warmth and softness of herself,
    she took me in her arms and sang to me
    in high, soft, clear, wild notes.
     
  14. Apr 17, 2009 #13

    fuzzyfelt

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    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    Good to see James Clerk Maxwell's poetry here, too.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2009
  15. Nov 17, 2009 #14
    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    ENTROPIC HOPE

    Dr. Smart, with sweeping dioramics,
    summarized theory accepted today:
    “The first few laws of thermodynamics:
    You can’t win, break even or get away.

    “No matter speed of acceleration,
    the universe runs down since the Big Bang.
    The fate of order is dissipation.
    The spring, once sprung, can’t be re-sprung. It sprang.

    “A system needs energy to survive
    or it’s unable to do work, of course.
    On galactic scales or like us, alive,
    complexity is the result of force.

    “And though the second law says we can’t win,
    it’s only ‘law’ to a statistician.”
     
  16. Nov 17, 2009 #15
    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    RARIFIED

    The physicist had reached the end
    of equations he’d worked for years.
    Excited, he called an old friend,
    to invite him out for some beers.
    When asked about the occasion,
    he smugly announced he’d worked-out
    the quark confinement equation,
    beyond any shadow of doubt.
    For strings of ev’ry dimension
    his elegant math had held true;
    no one could argue dissension!
    When there was no response, he knew,
    informed by silence on the phone,
    how far he’d come to be alone
     
  17. Nov 17, 2009 #16
    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    STRINGS ATTACHED

    Physicists foresee a utopia
    (once they squint through micro-myopia)
    where all of the forces of nature should
    become unified and be understood.
    Even in science, letting go is hard,
    and notions are the hardest to divorce,
    but, to reach there, they’ll have to discard
    their classical point-particles of force.

    While Newton works large-scale, his physics fail,
    and even Einstein’s theories can’t subsist,
    when applied to the sub-atomic scale.
    The answers they produce just can’t exist.

    Particle physics, in quantum foam, sank,
    when its researchers walked the length of Planck.
     
  18. Nov 17, 2009 #17
    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    VISIONARY

    He looked into the lens-system and saw
    an unimaginably small world grow.
    Now does this image in history draw
    from van Leeuwenhoek or Galileo?
    Through lenses both passed to another realm
    of being, since their broadened reference frame
    allowed them visions that could overwhelm.
    Then for everyone nothing stayed the same.
    The vaster one’s view the clearer things get,
    of cosmic, subatomic, even time,
    and, while the masses may first be upset,
    brought to some summit that they didn’t climb,
    it’s crucial so all the ingenious might
    be informed of the remarkable sight.
     
  19. Nov 17, 2009 #18
    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    SURVIVAL OF THE WITLESS

    When fire, water, earth and air were thought
    to be the elementals that composed
    all matter, folks did not become distraught
    at what avant-garde chemists then proposed.

    Most understand that the Earth is a sphere
    (with only one natural satellite);
    no matter where folks sail they do not fear
    they’ll reach the edge and fall into the night.

    Most even have embraced that time’s not fixed
    and have adopted relativity.
    So why should folks’ beliefs remain so mixed
    about evolution’s activity?

    Abundant evidence supports this view,
    yet institutions argue it’s not true.
     
  20. Nov 17, 2009 #19
    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    ILLUMINATED

    The physicists in their studies transcribe
    formulae that define reality.
    Theirs is a cloistered yet secular tribe
    that daily deals with strict duality.
    Foremost, their math must be made to agree,
    precisely, with all that can be observed,
    though, often, what we are able to see
    can misinform; they must not be unnerved.
    To gain acceptance, they are overseen
    by peers and the harshly economic,
    while pressured to find covenant between
    the classical and the subatomic,
    and, though they cannot see their superstring,
    keep faith that it will answer everything.
     
  21. Nov 18, 2009 #20

    marcus

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    Re: Science poetry--or verse that is just informative about nature

    I liked some of these, poeteye. Thanks for posting them!
     
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