SciFi Idea: What do you think about very long lifespans?

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  • #36
Hornbein
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I think at some point it will stop being a competition in life. People living so long would be more adapted to live harmoniously alongside one another probably. They may value respect and kindness and humor and whatnot more so than showoffy things. People's egos may be mellowed way out, and there may be few feats that will seem particilary impressive.
Consider young people.
 
  • #37
Jarvis323
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Consider young people.
Good point. I hadn't thought about that. I honestly have no idea what it would be like.
 
  • #38
stevendaryl
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Wouldn’t an immortal be spending his time trying to reconcile quantum theory with General Relativity?
 
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  • #39
Frabjous
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Wouldn’t an immortal be spending his time trying to reconcile quantum theory with General Relativity?
To no avail. Everyone knows that no good physics comes out of a person over 10035 Years old.
 
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  • #40
chemisttree
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I would plan to take over the world. Try everything to accomplish that.
Then I would plan to destroy everything.
Then I would plan on rebuilding everything back. If I wasn’t satisfied with the new, I would destroy everything again and build it back differently.

I call this existence the “Microsoft Model.”
 
  • #41
Keith_McClary
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Then I would plan on rebuilding everything back. If I wasn’t satisfied with the new, I would destroy everything again and build it back differently.
That could explain the Fermi Paradox.
 
  • #42
hmmm27
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The usual sci-fi tradeoff is that the immortalification process results in sterilization.

Realistically, when cultural equilibrium is reached natural childbirth would be banned and test-tube babies would cost as much as a house.
 
  • #45
dlgoff
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Assume you have effectively cracked immortality (or very long lifespans), have already solved all of the feasible interesting problems, and are now living million+ year lives. With nothing to challenge you, boredom and sense of purpose, should be the last unsolved problems right? So how do beings which have lived these long life times stay entertained, when they've already seen thousands of reruns of thousands of TV shows, read every sort of wikipedia article they can stand to read, and experienced every virtual reality sceneareo in the book? How do they live meaningful lives and what does that even mean over these ultra long lifespans, and with having incredible technological capabilities?
I saw a TV program lately about living "forever". It all depends on whether people really want to:
from https://www.dailymail.co.uk/science...ve-forever-33-Americans-immortality-pill.html
The survey asked 911 Americans if they would want to live forever
  • This was done by telling respondents that they would take an immortality pill
  • Only 33% said they would take it, 42% declined the offer and 25% were unsure
  • The results also showed that more men said they would take the pill
  • The survey also asked respondents what age they would like to freeze at
  • The youngest group of people, ranging from 18-28, said 23 years old
  • While another group that averaged the age of 72 wanted to live forever at 42
 
  • #46
TachyonGod
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Don't forget the Yoda Syndrome!

Given that we have various biological events that happen throughout the aging process. i.e. babies grow rapidly in the first 2-3 years because there is a relatively massive release of growth hormone in that time. There is another growth spurt during the teenage years, Menopause in middle age, and various diseases that occur in old age. They are all triggered by genetic signals.

The Yoda Syndrome describes what happens when, what is normally considered junk DNA begins expressing itself in extended older ages. Since evolutions never considers genetic various expressed beyond procreation, during the child rearing years. We really don't know what changes the body would goes through with extended life.

How the body could change in just the first 800 years, could very well start looking like Yoda.
 
  • #47
Frabjous
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Don't forget the Yoda Syndrome!

Given that we have various biological events that happen throughout the aging process. i.e. babies grow rapidly in the first 2-3 years because there is a relatively massive release of growth hormone in that time. There is another growth spurt during the teenage years, Menopause in middle age, and various diseases that occur in old age. They are all triggered by genetic signals.

The Yoda Syndrome describes what happens when, what is normally considered junk DNA begins expressing itself in extended older ages. Since evolutions never considers genetic various expressed beyond procreation, during the child rearing years. We really don't know what changes the body would goes through with extended life.

How the body could change in just the first 800 years, could very well start looking like Yoda.
Don’t forget that Yoda’s incompetent leadership led to galactic collapse and billions of deaths. What if one starts thinking like him?
 
  • #48
AlexB23
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Assume you have effectively cracked immortality (or very long lifespans), have already solved all of the feasible interesting problems, and are now living million+ year lives. With nothing to challenge you, boredom and sense of purpose, should be the last unsolved problems right? So how do beings which have lived these long life times stay entertained, when they've already seen thousands of reruns of thousands of TV shows, read every sort of wikipedia article they can stand to read, and experienced every virtual reality sceneareo in the book? How do they live meaningful lives and what does that even mean over these ultra long lifespans, and with having incredible technological capabilities? Do points arise where there are too many gods in the kitchen, or where acting like one becomes clique?

As sub-topics, what are the limitations, and effects on memory, when your brain has lived for millions of years, and you have the plasticity that might be needed for this? Does evolution become something a single being does, simply because their bodies and brains live for long periods, and must go through some continual changes naturally as biological tissue regenerates and maintains itself, and the brain processes and stores memories. Over the long term, does what your brain becomes depend on the information it processes and what it does in response? Maybe there is some healthy long-scale lifestyle involving optimally stimulating the mind? Can you keep living (mentally) a continuously new/advancing life, or is there some cycle like effect that needs to occur as you forget parts of the past to make room for the future? How does this work in a society?

Anyway, one scenario is they are constantly trying to find the most interesting new things they haven't seen before . They send out probes all throughout their observable universe trying to find interesting planets, civilizations, star systems, etc. to gather usable media for entertainment. In other words, they are mining the universe for entertainment. Well, but after the first 2 or 3 or more billions of years since they've been doing this, they are now dealing with unthinkable amounts of data from millions or billions of populated worlds. So what is the big industry? It's data mining all of this information, to extract noteworthy, captivating stories that people will enjoy. This is what the universes largest supercomputer is working on for sure? But wait a minute, how can you follow and document a good story (some substantially connected, substantially lengthy series of events, with quality supporting media) if it's happening thousands or more light years away? By the time you've gathered the info, it's already passed and you've missed most of it. So you would need to produce the content largely on location. Only later, throughout millions of years, will it make it's rounds incrementally throughout the widely distributed network it's produced for. Anyways, so you basically have large parts of the universe populated by film and production crews scouting the many populated worlds for good stories. So sometimes, when they find one, the story becomes so important that they have to protect it, foster it, influence it, and so forth. In some cases, this means some peoples lives, whole epochs of history, wars, extinction and emergence of new species (e.g. dinosaurs, humans), are unknowingly the centers of high value inter-galaxy productions.

My species, the Neledrax on the Xanadu Wastelands planet have a lifespan of 75-85 years (2.9 gigaBerkels in their unit system). In 2042, they have a technology allowing them to manufacture stuff for free using a molecular assembler. These devices are connected to the power grid, which runs partly on fusion, and mainly on renewables such as space based solar energy, solar, wind and hydro. In theory, a dead Neledraxian could be revived using a molecular assembler, or cells regenerated every few years. However, an international law part of the Standardized Regulatory Directives (global constitution, basically), made in 2041, said molecular assemblers must not be used to extend life or perform direct repair of a lifeform beyond the production of medicines.

Are there any legal systems set on your planet prohibiting unnecessary life extension, even if the technology exists to make your aliens or humans live 1000 years?
 

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