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Should CNN be allowed to host any more debates?

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  1. Nov 29, 2007 #1

    chemisttree

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    CNN does it again...

    Clinton supporter questions GOP candidates in YouTube debate.

    Anderson Cooper admitted that Kerr was listed as a member of a steering committee for Hillary Clinton.

    Joe Scarborough scoffed at the idea that CNN didn't know that Kerr was a member of Hillary's campaign.

    Should CNN be allowed to host any more debates?

     
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  3. Nov 29, 2007 #2
    Pretty weird that they just let any old American ask questions like that. Maybe they should screen them and plant fake reporters like the Whitehouse has been doing for years.

    I'm just laughing, maybe the Dem's finally learned something from Karl Rove.
     
  4. Nov 29, 2007 #3

    russ_watters

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    It isn't terribly surprising that the candidates would plant questioners in their debates - all of their rallys are staged anyway, why not the debates too? What is disturbing (but unfortunately also not too surprising) is that CNN seems to condone it, or at least, play the willing patsie.

    But "allowed" just simply isn't a relevant question - CNN can do what they want here and the candidates can do what they want if CNN lets them. Unless CNN actively/openly endorses a candidate, they are not breaking the law, so there is no one to stop allowing them to do this.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2007
  5. Nov 29, 2007 #4
    CNN is using the same playing field for both parties. Both Democrats and Republicans have had the youtube questions.
     
  6. Nov 30, 2007 #5

    russ_watters

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    Well, no - the implication being made here is that both the Democratic and Republican debates have democratic plants asking the questions. Whether it does work both ways, I can't rule out - you can't get both sides of the story from a single blog - but the blogs linked show just that.
     
  7. Nov 30, 2007 #6

    ShawnD

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    This brings up an interesting question. Instead of trying to suppress plants, why not make it part of the debate? Aside from the usual questions, both parties could have maybe 5 people each ask any question to any candidate. Some democrat question could be towards Hillary and be something like "is it true that you'll <positive things>" then Hillary has her own little circle jerk a minute. Then some republican question could be directed at Hillary and be "what do you plan to do about <all kinds of things that she has no plan on fixing>"

    It's not really slanted if the questions are valid. Why do black people vote democrat? Why do hard core christians vote republican? If <candidate> intends to <strategy> how will they fix <problem> that happens as a result of that strategy? These are valid questions that people want answered.
     
  8. Nov 30, 2007 #7

    chemisttree

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    I would agree that after the nominating conventions that the final two candidates should answer questions from both sides. These debates are really aimed at their own respective party supporters and should have questions that their own supporters want answered.

    By the way, what Republican supporters asked questions in the Democratic debate... I must have missed it.
     
  9. Nov 30, 2007 #8
    http://mediamatters.org/items/200711270007

    I'm not sure if if it's the right place for the gay general to ask his question. He is not going to get a straight(pun) answer from these weasels.
     
  10. Nov 30, 2007 #9

    ShawnD

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    The first and third questions you quoted seem valid. Will you raise taxes, and how do you plan to pull out? The second is just retarded; did he actually refer to his gun as "my baby"? The fourth sounds like an emotional response from somebody who served, regardless of which party they side with. It always hurts to be told that your friends died in vain.
     
  11. Nov 30, 2007 #10
    Any question is valid. However they are not asked by dems during the dems debate.
     
  12. Nov 30, 2007 #11

    chemisttree

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    I don't know how you get that. Not true that 'any question is valid.' It does appear that republicans asked some questions during the first Dem debate, however. It does seem that the first two questions were asked by Republican-leaning people.
    The second two are a little hard to discern... could be either party. The (Hillary Clinton brainchild) Media Matters site listed several others that were clearly not Republican regarding same-sex marriage and sexism as it relates to foriegn relations. These were characterized by the site as being Republican 'gotchas'. I don't think the two lesbians in Brooklyn (who asked the question about same sex marriage) were Republicans!

    Hmmm, where else have I heard the term 'gotcha' in the debates?
     
  13. Nov 30, 2007 #12

    russ_watters

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    Well, yeah it is. The whole point of opening the floor to questions is to have them unscripted so you can get [relatively] candid answers. If they are going to be scripted, why not just cut them out completely and let the candidates have the time to make a 2 minute speech? There isn't any fundamental difference except in appearance.
     
  14. Nov 30, 2007 #13

    ShawnD

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    You're absolutely right, but I was thinking more in terms of republicans planting questions in a democrat debate. If republicans are doing it, their purpose is to make somebody look bad, but if you think about it, you can only make yourself look bad. The worst a republican can do is ask a question where the candidate's answer is unpopular, but whose fault is that? Either that or the candidate will have no answer, because they don't know the answer. Again, is that the fault of the candidate, or the person asking the question?
     
  15. Nov 30, 2007 #14

    russ_watters

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    "The answer"? You seem to be saying here that the questions have right and wrong answers - and that Republicans are always wrong and Democrats are always right. You do realize that about half of the US population is conservative and a Republican plant asking Hillary Clinton "You are a baby killing hippie, aren't you?" might right a lot of bells.

    But maybe I misunderstood - could you explain why a mean-spirited or pointed question couldn't make a Democratic candidate look bad?
     
  16. Nov 30, 2007 #15

    chemisttree

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    I think the point of the debates is to determine who among the field best represents the party's goals in the election. I don't think that Democrats are going to use a stance on gun control to determine that. Definitely that question didn't deserve to be asked at the Democrat debate. The same goes for the question of gays in the military asked in the Republican debate. I don't know of any Republicans that are using that as a guide for choosing any of the candidates.

    Some of these questions should have obviously been weeded out but CNN allowed them. A little background check wouldn't have hurt either. A Harry Reid staffer isn't what I would call an 'undecided' voter....
     
  17. Nov 30, 2007 #16

    ShawnD

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    Of course.

    Question: I'd like to know, if the Democrats come into office, are my taxes going to rise like usually they do when a Democrat gets into office?

    Answer: I have no intention of raising taxes. I plan to balance the budget by reducing government spending, and eliminating republican-created pork projects whenever possible.


    If that isn't their real answer, and they really do intend to raise taxes, the people have a right to know this. Or stand there like an idiot saying "uh...." to indicate that that no thought was put into the budget at all, in which case the republican plant did a good job at making the candidate look like the idiot he or she is.
     
  18. Dec 3, 2007 #17
    I watched some of the Republican debate and caught the part with the gay former general asking questions. He was in the audience and took the mic several times, putting the candidates on the spot.

    This really was a political statement on his part.

    I say this in the context that the "issue" regarding the policy of "don't ask, don't tell" is a common theme among the republicans running for president.

    If this were the Democratic debate and a "plant" asked about abortion I think I would of been a little upset about the planned disruption.

    The line was crossed, but not in an overly disruptive way - this time.
     
  19. Dec 3, 2007 #18

    chemisttree

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    But the 'don't ask, don't tell' policy was crafted and signed into law by Bill Clinton.
     
  20. Dec 3, 2007 #19
    They should have let the YouTube community pick the questions by voting on them. I believe they would eliminated the stupid stuff and posed only the valid questions people really wanted asked. All the candidates should have to answer each question. That way we get to see each of their opinions on the issues. By allowing directed questions it makes it so someone can ask a question to one candidate just to make them look bad
     
  21. Dec 3, 2007 #20
    Yep, sounds too much like Democracy, can't have that here.

    Kiss and tell...............prior to that it was kiss and get kicked out.

    Progress is not progress if all stands still.
     
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