Should I submit an outlandish physics idea that feels right?

In summary, this theory has the potential to be interesting, but is not currently stable or well-supported.
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Ahmed1029
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I'm curious to get people's opinions about whether this is interesting enough to write up for submission.

I arrived at a set of coordinate transformations that are different from the Lorentz transformations, but which produce a coherent mechanical framework. It gives a very beautiful physical picture, reduces to Newtonian mechanics at low velocities and is compatible with the postulates of SR, yet predicts phenomena that should be measurable at high enough velocities and that have never been proposed before.

I have all the necessary equations, yet I'm not sure if this can be published since the theory is based on an unsupported bold guess that seems to be right, and I'm not sure if it solves any current problem in theoretical physics. Should I submit an article?
 
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Depends. Are you prepared to defend it against harsh criticism? Worse, are you prepared to have it ignored and not taken seriously?
 
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  • #3
DaveC426913 said:
Depends. Are you prepared to defend it against harsh criticism? Worse, are you prepared to have it ignored and not taken seriously?
Sure. I've been really looking to find something new about physics for a while now, but every idea I got was trivially wrong or inconsistent. This one I think is either true or too heavy for me to falsify. I'm generally however not afraid from embarrassment.
 
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To clarify, I'm not saying those things will happen, simply that you should be prepared.
 
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Thread closed temporarily for Moderation...
 
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Ahmed1029 said:
I'm curious to get people's opinions about whether this is interesting enough to write up for submission.

I arrived at a set of coordinate transformations that are different from the Lorentz transformations, but which produce a coherent mechanical framework. It gives a very beautiful physical picture, reduces to Newtonian mechanics at low velocities and is compatible with the postulates of SR, yet predicts phenomena that should be measurable at high enough velocities and that have never been proposed before.

I have all the necessary equations, yet I'm not sure if this can be published since the theory is based on an unsupported bold guess that seems to be right, and I'm not sure if it solves any current problem in theoretical physics. Should I submit an article?
As you know from your previous warnings, PF is not the place to try to discuss new personal theories. Thread will remain closed, and you should be sure to read through this Insights article: https://www.physicsforums.com/insights/wont-look-new-theory/
 
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Related to Should I submit an outlandish physics idea that feels right?

1. Should I submit an outlandish physics idea that feels right?

It depends on the context and purpose of the submission. If you are submitting to a reputable scientific journal or conference, it is important to have solid evidence and data to support your idea. However, if you are simply sharing your idea with colleagues or discussing it in a brainstorming session, it can be beneficial to explore unconventional ideas.

2. How do I know if my outlandish physics idea is valid?

Validating a physics idea requires rigorous testing and experimentation. It is important to gather evidence and data through experiments, simulations, and observations to support your idea. Additionally, seeking feedback and peer review from other scientists can help determine the validity of your idea.

3. Will submitting an outlandish physics idea harm my credibility as a scientist?

Submitting an outlandish physics idea does not necessarily harm your credibility as a scientist. In fact, proposing unconventional ideas can lead to groundbreaking discoveries and advancements in the field. However, it is important to have solid evidence and data to support your idea and to be open to feedback and criticism from other scientists.

4. Are there any risks to submitting an outlandish physics idea?

There are some potential risks to submitting an outlandish physics idea. If the idea is not well-supported by evidence and data, it may be rejected by scientific journals or conferences. Additionally, proposing ideas that go against established theories or principles may face skepticism and criticism from the scientific community.

5. How can I present an outlandish physics idea in a convincing manner?

To present an outlandish physics idea in a convincing manner, it is important to have a clear and logical argument supported by evidence and data. Presenting your idea in a well-organized and professional manner, such as through a research paper or presentation, can also help make it more convincing. Seeking feedback and incorporating constructive criticism can also strengthen your argument.

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