Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

So how much of a do you actually give about the whole 'green' thing?

  1. Oct 31, 2007 #1
    so how much of a **** do you actually give about the whole 'green' thing?

    is it really worth worrying about in your opinion?

    someone just sent me this

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/treadlightly?CMP=OTCTreadLightly2

    you register, they give you 'green' tasks to do, and you pledge whether you're going to do them or not - then confess whether you got round to doing them



    the comments page is pretty amusing - it swings from the predictably smug:

    "We already use energy efficient light bulbs throughout the house, switch light off when not used , don't leave TVs etc on standby. But we have learnt a new way of saving on energy and water. We already made sure that the dishwasher was full before turning it on, but now we move the dial forward to exclude the rinsing cycle (unless the dishes are heavily soiled) and we reckon we save at least 18 gallons of water this way."


    to the viciously amusing:

    "Are we being serious when we suggest using a different cycle on our dishwashers as a radical, eco-aware strategy?
    Help me out here.
    Meanwhile, I've discovered that idling my Porsche Cayenne on the drive for 10 minutes warms up the engine so it runs more efficiently when I drive my child the half mile to school.
    How am I doing?"

    but anyway - do you give a monkey's?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 31, 2007 #2

    Mk

    User Avatar

    All those things listed save money and I do them. Because I like money. As for doing it to help keep the world from imploding, I don't give a monkey's uncle.
     
  4. Oct 31, 2007 #3

    Chi Meson

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    I have always been environmentally aware. I would guess that I am more "green" than at least half of all people who cal themselves environmentalists. But this green registry makes me feel a little ill. I have never been under the misapprehension that I am "saving the earth." I just do not choose to believe that being opulently wasteful is proof of living a significant life.

    I prefer to think of my choices as keeping me freer from corporate edicts. It would be hypocritical if I felt that my edicts should apply to anyone else.

    But hey, If you drive a Hummer, you will be the first to be sad.
     
  5. Oct 31, 2007 #4

    Ivan Seeking

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    There have always been those who make a difference while the rest sit around and complain and deny the problems. Apparently many people are too selfish and just don't have what it takes to give a little, so drive that Hummer and be wasteful while you still can. Your children will have to live with the consequences more than you, so why care? It is just too hard; you're just not up to the task. I understand.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2007
  6. Oct 31, 2007 #5

    DaveC426913

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    1] Would I be throwing away good money if I bet you were under 30 years old?

    2] As with most societal changes, it takes years, decades, generations to penetrate common culture. Even if our generation doesn't have a practical effect on Earth's health, to the coming generation, green habits will be second-nature.

    3] If you don't plan to have children (and don't believe in reincarnation) then there's little practical reason to go green. But parents often have a very different view on the matter.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2007
  7. Oct 31, 2007 #6
    The registering, I believe is more about the principles and values that this encompases than anything else... Putting your name down and what you do is the least important part about it. What it is doing is making people realise that the responsibility of looking after the world is up to them, it's up to all of us, and everyone makes that little bit of difference. Even if it is using energy saving light bulbs, or skipping the rinse cycle on your dish washer atleast those people making an effort for a better greener, healthier future if not for us, for the next generations.
     
  8. Nov 1, 2007 #7
    We should each stay "green" to make us feel better and all that karma crap. But as far a CO2 goes, give it a rest. Lets not dump toxic waste into the rivers. That will kill the fish. But in your 3000 square foot house, a few energy efficient light bulbs are not going to make "Global Warming" go away. The liberal invented "Global Warming" can apparently be fixed by me not flushing the toilet when I pee. "Global Warming" is a lie. I stay "green" to save money. I try to eat less meat and more veggies because it makes me feel better. I don't wear fur because it would make me look gay and creepy. My contribution to the environment:

    I am going to start a petition. The whole world will sign it. World leaders to peasants. It will state, "Please mister sun, try to give us more constant energy. The fluxuations and flares terrify us." We will send it to the sun on a 75 trillion dollar rocket ship that uses all of the worlds old tires as fuel. No wait, that would pollute the non-atmosphere of space, having lasting negative effects on our children.
     
  9. Nov 1, 2007 #8

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I was laughing at the comments from the vegans on that site who apparently think it's the fault of the animals...darn cow farts! Should I suggest that when they eat so many vegetables, they hold in all their farts so they don't contribute to greenhouse gas emissions? :biggrin:

    A few lightbulbs isn't going to help much (especially when the "energy efficient" lightbulbs I've bought all cost so much more than regular bulbs, don't give off as much light, and die sooner...maybe they have better ones in Britain, but the ones sold here are a scam as far as I can tell). Not turning lights on when you don't need them on helps more than leaving on a housefull of "energy efficient" bulbs all the time.

    But, yeah, I found the comments amusing too...but in a sad sort of way. I sort of assumed these were things people already knew, that if you wait for the dishwasher to be full before running it, or only use the shortest cycle needed to clean the dishes, it's going to be more energy and water efficient than running it only half full on the heavy duty cycle. Why do people need to be told this in this day and age? So, I guess if there really are that many people who still don't know this, such an article has a real purpose.

    There are probably also plenty of people who know these things help conserve energy (and yes, money, which is often more of an incentive), but lapse into more careless habits, and making a pledge like this, or just reading about it, can help remind them to be more careful again.
     
  10. Nov 1, 2007 #9

    Chi Meson

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    You must be very unlucky with the cf bulbs. All but 6 of the bulbs in my house are cfs. I have some cf bulbs that I bought in 1995 still burning in some sockets. The most common reason for needing to replace them is accidental breakage. As far as cost, in 1995 I was paying $11 to $15 per bulb. Through the local electric company I bought some nice fixtures (torchieres and desk lamps) for $30 (bulb included, still burning 6 years later), and a dozen cf bulbs at about $2.50 each. Last year I got a whole case of 75 watt equivalent (14 watt actual) for $0.79 each. I gave them out to my students while explaining I was giving them about $75 dollars (it would take 5 years to accumulate that money, but I was giving it to them nonetheless).

    I usually keep one filament bulb in each bathroom, and one in the living room to add color balance since cfs are a little strong on the green light.
     
  11. Nov 1, 2007 #10

    Mk

    User Avatar

    You could be great for winning a war, but rarely are the heros recognized who saved lives and resources by keeping needless wars from occurring in the first place.
     
  12. Nov 1, 2007 #11

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Indeed. It's not like I only tried them once and got a defective one. I assumed that was the case the first time, and tried other brands and in different fixtures (in case it was something about the fixture location burning them out too quickly), and they've all died on me within a week to a month, and the light they gave off was pretty horrible. Everything seemed blue. That might be fine for rooms like the bedroom or bathroom where I don't need the light for much other than avoiding tripping over things, but it's no good in the kitchen or office or living room, because I can't do detail work or read under that sort of lighting.

    Now, one way that they might work would be in those fixtures with multiple bulbs (like the ceiling fans with 4 lamps) that can be switched on and off in groups of two. Put two of the cf ones in, and 2 regular incandescent in, and for most days, you just need the two cf bulbs on, but if you need a little more light while reading, or working on a craft project, you can flip the switch for the incandescent bulbs.

    But, doesn't matter, I've given up on those cf bulbs because they're too expensive when they only last a month for me.
     
  13. Nov 1, 2007 #12

    Ivan Seeking

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Yes, it is a war. If you don't conserve you will be shot. :rolleyes:
     
  14. Nov 1, 2007 #13

    Ivan Seeking

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I've had the same problem with CFs. Often they don't last longer than a few months; even with limited usage. The ones that seem to do the best are the ones with the highest duty cycles.
     
  15. Nov 2, 2007 #14

    DaveC426913

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I think it's less about knowing than it is about being reminded or pointed at the right things. Brain-cycles are in high-demand and constant easy reminders that don't require cycles will get through to those who don't make Green a conscious act in their lives.
     
  16. Nov 2, 2007 #15
    I think the biggest thing I really do is trying to reduce waste. I don't use paper towels to dry my hands, and I don't use the plastic or paper bags at the grocery store. I try not to have reciepts printed, and I get banking statements online instead of in the mail. Its nothing big, but it makes a difference. I do the common sense stuff too like the lightbulbs, but I'm more concerned about all the waste we create personally.
     
  17. Nov 12, 2007 #16
    It's important. We don't have to go back to living in caves and get rid of things that are important, but we should cut out things we can live happily without. Like lunchables, and idling the car, and in the summer hang out clothes on the clothesline.

    I guess i just don't want to be responsible for desertification and forest fires and stuff. Don't want that on my conscience :)
     
  18. Nov 12, 2007 #17

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I believe in cleaning up pollution. Everything else is speculation, so I'll stick to pollution.
     
  19. Nov 13, 2007 #18
    In addition to that, it might be a good idea to preserve biodiversity and natural habitats. But a position about that would be quite different if your outside view is rural or if you're seeing nothing but roofs until the horizon.
     
  20. Nov 13, 2007 #19

    Chi Meson

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Have people heard Newt Gingrich's position on the environment? This formerly partisan pitbull has what seems to be the most rational, non-reactionary yet cautious stance on environmental issues. He and Ron Paul (a Libertarian-Republican) have the environmental positions closest to my own (I would never privatize the National Parks).

    Go ahead, try to call them liberal. You just can't!
     
  21. Nov 13, 2007 #20

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    What is Ron Paul's environmental stance? All I could find was an interview where he appeared to be blaming global warming on communists. (he's nuttier than a Snickers bar).

    This is all I could find on his environmental position. He does not even list the environment or climate change as issues on his website.

    Listen to these interviews, he makes absolutely no sense, rambling on about soviets and the government taking over your property...did he ever get close to actually answering the question? No. The question was "what is your take on the environment and more specifically, what would you do to get rid of our dependance on foreign oil. Uhm, Earth to Ron, come in Ron.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTr50dREplg&NR=1

    Ron Paul Answers Global Warming Question

    "The environments are always taken better care of with strict property rights". Communism was the most destructive environmental society we ever had.

    Q)Do you think C02 is part of the air quality issue? Ron - I think there's a debate about it, I don't think anybody has the final answer on that, C02 comes from ocean waters and (the rest is rather garbled)

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: So how much of a do you actually give about the whole 'green' thing?
Loading...