Stars colliding/meeting up with each other

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In summary, the likelihood of two stars colliding while orbiting the center of a galaxy is extremely low. Even during our galaxy's collision with Andromeda, collisions will still be rare due to the immense spaces between stars. Collisions do occur between stars that have been orbiting each other for a long time or have been affected by external factors. However, these events are not common within the span of a human life but may occur more frequently in the lifespan of a star.
  • #1
Bladibla
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How likely is it that when stars are orbiting the centre of a galaxy that two stars will meet and be locked together and orbit each other or collide?
 
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  • #2
EXTREMELY unlikely

In a few billion years time, when our Milky Way galaxy collides with the Andromeda galaxy, collisions will still be very VERY rare.
The spaces between stars are IMMENSE, so the chances of any two random stars colliding with each other are negligible.

Stars DO collide though - bt almost always they are stars that have been orbiting each other for a LONG time, with a degrading orbit - or maybe one of them has shed some matter in it's death-throes, affecting the orbit enough to cause it to degrade.

Some Gamma ray bursts are thought to be caused by either two neutron stars coming together, or possibly a neutron star and a black hole
 
  • #3
Seems to me that it would be quite common, depending on the time frame you're thinking of. Sure there's a lot of space there, but there are a lot of stars as well, and they all have plenty of gravity to pull them towards each other.
If you're thinking of the time frame of a human life, then they are very rare, but thinking by the time frame of a stellar life, they are common.
 

Related to Stars colliding/meeting up with each other

1. What happens when stars collide?

When stars collide, it can result in a variety of outcomes depending on the mass and composition of the stars. In some cases, the stars may merge together to form a larger, more massive star. In other cases, the collision can cause a massive explosion known as a supernova.

2. How often do stars collide in our galaxy?

While it may seem like stars are constantly colliding, the truth is that the likelihood of two stars colliding in our galaxy is extremely low. This is due to the vast distances between stars and the fact that they are constantly moving in different directions.

3. Can stars collide with planets?

Yes, stars can collide with planets, but it is a very rare occurrence. The chances of a star colliding with a planet are much lower than the chances of two stars colliding with each other. However, when it does happen, it can have catastrophic consequences for the planet and its inhabitants.

4. What happens when two stars of different sizes collide?

The outcome of a collision between two stars of different sizes can vary greatly. If a smaller star collides with a larger star, it may be engulfed and absorbed by the larger star. However, if two stars of similar size collide, they may merge together to form a new, larger star.

5. Is it possible for stars to collide and create new elements?

Yes, when stars collide, the extreme temperatures and pressures can cause nuclear fusion reactions that create new elements. These elements are then expelled into space, enriching the surrounding area and potentially leading to the formation of new stars and planets.

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