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Start learning more about fractals

  1. Apr 15, 2013 #1
    Hi,

    I'm curious to start learning more about fractals and am wondering what some of the classic/decent texts in the field are.

    Any suggestions would be much appreciated.

    Thanks!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 16, 2013 #2
    http://classes.yale.edu/fractals/

    Depending on what you already know, this may be too simple. Mandelbrot's book is obviously classic, but I have not actually read it; I don't know if it is any use for learning. Sorry, I don't have much info, but this page gives a good first look.
     
  4. Apr 16, 2013 #3

    Bacle2

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  5. Apr 17, 2013 #4

    Stephen Tashi

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    I've read parts of Madelbrot's "The Fractal Geometry Of Nature". Many technical passages would only make sense to people famiiar with the mathematics of Brownian motion. It isn't organized as a textbook. There are more pretty pictures than technical text. It's more a "coffee table" book.
     
  6. Apr 17, 2013 #5

    micromass

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    A nice book is https://www.amazon.com/Fractals-Everywhere-Edition-Dover-Mathematics/dp/0486488705 The book introduces most of its concepts, so it should be readable for a high-school student. However, I think that this high school student will struggle very hard. I recommend that you're familiar with metric spaces. If you are, then this book will pose no problems.

    A more difficult book is https://www.amazon.com/Measure-Topology-Geometry-Undergraduate-Mathematics/dp/0387747486 It covers a lot of nice things. However, it is much more difficult. I attempted to read this book as a freshman student and I got really frustrated. It doesn't help that every proof ends with a smiley that appears to be laughing at your ignorance.
    Once you're familiar with topology and measure theory, then this book should be readable and the book will be excellent.
     
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