Summer pictures, or Boreks in Croatia (and Hungary)

In summary: Varaždin Cathedral:In summary, Marzena went to Croatia to visit the Plitvice Lakes National Park, the Hungarian Grey cattle, the Burnum arches, the Plitvice Lakes National Park, the Kozjak lake, the Plitvice Lakes National Park (again), the Baško Polje camping ground, the Salona ruins, the Vrboska port, the Varaždin Cathedral.
  • #1
Borek
Mentor
28,957
4,257
As promised long ago - pictures from Croatia (and a few from Hungary).

There were three parts of the trip. Marzena told me she is not going to sleep in the car or bushes in random places, and that was part of my plan. So I bought her a plane ticket to Split, promised to collect her from the airport, packed the car - and left a week earlier. That was the start of the first part.

My first stop was in Hortobagy. I wanted to see Hungarian Grey cattle and puszta. It mostly worked - that is, I have seen the cattle (this is actually a bull, with his own collection of flies):

IMG_1271.jpg


draw well typical for puszta:

IMG_1230.jpg


and Hungarian buffalo (with even larger collection of flies):

IMG_1246.jpg


Next day I drove to Plitvice Lakes National Park (which meant about 1500 km in two days). This is a beautiful place, but so crowded walking there was for most of the time rather unpleasant. If you ever happen to visit Plitivice, go around a Kozjak lake - no people there. Crowd was so thick it was difficult to take pictures in the most picturesque parts of the park (full of waterfalls), so only two from other places:

IMG_1334.jpg


IMG_1413.jpg


Not all paths are wooden, but some are.

After Plitvice I spent a day around Knin. Main road to Knin was closed, I was driving a detour and lo - spotted something I have already seen on pictures (so called Burnum arches):

IMG_1565.jpg


They were in the https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?p=3155780&highlight=Burnum+arches#post3155780 this year, but I didn't plan to see the place - it was completely accidental.

In the Knin and around there are plenty signs of the war, some villages are almost completely deserted, there are plenty of deserted houses - this one with a painted sign Oluja 95 (Oluja - Operation Storm - was a Croatian military operation in August '95):

IMG_1456.jpg


As everywhere in Croatia, landscape is incredible:

IMG_1428.jpg


IMG_1562.jpg


History is still fresh here. Which doesn't mean life doesn't continue:

IMG_1451.jpg


From Knin I drove to the sea, to wander north and south for two days. This is a city of Korčula, on the Korčula island:

IMG_1684.jpg


And this is a small village high above Makarska:

IMG_1741.jpg


Bed is ready :biggrin: - camping on Korčula (I had to stop in civilized places now and then to take a shower):

IMG_1627.jpg


And the views... I am not even 100% sure where these were taken, either on Korčula or on Pelješac:

IMG_1613.jpg


IMG_1685.jpg


Roads in Croatia are not for faint-hearted, what you see is not wide enough for two cars, so there is a bay (is it how it is called in English?) on the right, to create passing place:

IMG_1897.jpg


Actually getting to the place where I took the picture was a crazy thing to do, I had to walk about 100 meters on the very narrow road between wall and a barrier to get there; luckily there were no cars for a moment.

After a week I collected Marzena from the Split airport. Our plan was to go to Hvar island, but as I wasn't sure we will be able to get to the ferry on time, I pitched our tent on a camping place in Baško Polje. That meant we were not in hurry, so we went to see ruins of Salona. While driving there (pretty close from the airport) we have seen a strange cloud, but we didn't realize it is a smoke before we stopped and left the car. Now I know it was a forest fire on Brač island, but at the time it was not clear if the fire is on Brač or Hvar (both islands are in the same direction). I was even afraid Hvar can be closed for arrivals. We were at least 20 km from the fire, but we could smell the smoke and when we got back to the car there was some ash on the roof. So, this is Solona and a cloud of smoke:

IMG_9507.jpg


Next day we got to Vrboska. This is port in Vrboska:

IMG_2048.jpg


and the famous fortress church:

IMG_2055.jpg


Note the wind changed direction, so the smoke is visible again.

Next two weeks (over two weeks) we spent getting tan, walking, swimming, diving, visiting different places on the island and so on. So, for example, this is how Jelsa looks from above (if you are ready to climb up in temperatures in the 90 deg F range):

Tor-panorama-thumbnail.jpg


(huge version - 5MB and will require scrolling)

There are no beaches on Hvar (in general there are no beaches in Croatia), coast is almost always rocky:

IMG_2582.jpg


IMG_3224.jpg


but you don't need a beach to have fun:

IMG_3236.jpg


Surprisingly, weather wasn't perfect. That's a rare thing on Hvar.

IMG_0009.jpg


Third part was the trip back. On the way north it happened that we had enough time for a side trip, so we decided to see the Varaždin - it was just close enough to the highway, it was early enough, and we wanted to stop to eat something. And Varaždin was a very pleasant surprise, we liked it. Well, we have seen only the old city - but we highly recommend it.

IMG_3453.jpg


IMG_3466.jpg


IMG_3478.jpg


Then, as planned, we went to Budapest. And - to be honest - we didn't like it :blushing: That is, there is nothing wrong with the city, it just didn't work with us. We prefer Prague.

IMG_1094.jpg


IMG_3507.jpg


While on Hvar we meet Poles, who told us to visit Tokaj. It wasn't exactly on our road to Warsaw, but we had some time reserve, so getting back a day later was not a problem. And Tokaj was great. City is not as picturesque as - say - Varaždin. It is nice, it has its charm, but it is all about wine. City smells of wine, city is full of cellars, you can buy wine in every place, it is incredibly cheap, and very good. We have spent there one night only, but we bought something like 10 liters of wine to take it home. Again, highly recommended.

Bor means wine, pince means cellar. These are two most popular words in Tokaj.

IMG_3869.jpg


Price list behind Marzena says 500 - but that's for a very special wine, called Aszu. Prices start with with 80 Ft for a 100 mL glass - that's about 40 cents, and this cheap wine is already quite good.

IMG_3921.jpg


That's all for today, perhaps more later...

Edit: three of the pictures (Solona, rain on Hvar and Parliament building in Budapest) were taken by Marzena.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
These photos are just stunning. Thanks for sharing.
 
  • #3
IMG_1684.jpg


Wow that is amazing. What exactly is down there? Do "normal" people work/live down there or is it a touristy place and/or rich people historic district?
 
  • #4
Great images, Borek! I'd love to visit some of Eastern Europe, but sadly, unless someone builds my a trans-Atlantic bridge, that won't happen. Love to visit Tokaj, though not for the gorgeous scenery.
 
  • #6
QuarkCharmer said:
IMG_1684.jpg


Wow that is amazing. What exactly is down there? Do "normal" people work/live down there or is it a touristy place and/or rich people historic district?

Fifty-fifty. I walked these streets, most of the premises open to the streets are used as shops, offices, bars and so on, some are rented to tourists, but obviously many are used just for living.

Streets in Croatia are interesting as well (well, I guess this is typical of hot climates), as they are always very narrow and in shadow (which makes taking pictures very difficult). This one is in Split, and rather wide:

split.jpg


The girl that you see is just picking her nose. Sigh. There are thousands of ways of wasting a picture.
 
  • #7
Great work Borek,

Just clone out that nose picking girl
 
  • #8
I realized what have happened immediately, so I took another picture. But I find it funny enough to use this one :smile:
 
  • #9
Borek said:
The girl that you see is just picking her nose.

Nice to know that no matter where you go, people are all the same :)
 
  • #10
Wow, nice places and nice pix!
 
  • #11
Fascinating views, thanks for sharing.
 
  • #12
I almost forgot - these pictures were taken especially for jtbell. Budapest trams - end stop:

IMG_3721.jpg


and inside - doors on both sides (closed on the left, open behind the man reading a newspaper):

IMG_3722.jpg


No idea about proper English nomenclature, but they can go in either direction (cabins for drivers on each end of the tram), so they don't need a rail loop at the end of line. No such trams in Warsaw, I am not sure if they are used in other Polish cities.
 
  • #13
lisab said:
Wow, nice places and nice pix!

Seconded, really good. :smile:

... Did Marzena take any photos?.. Just asking. :biggrin:
 
  • #14
drizzle said:
Did Marzena take any photos?.. Just asking. :biggrin:

Plenty, but only three posted. They are listed at the very end of my first post.
 
  • #15
I really like your pictures, they are beatiful.

btw, best time to visit Plitvice Lakes is in autumn because it's not crowded and landscape is very colorful.
 
  • #16
I wonder if there might have been forest fires or bushfires when visiting some summers ago, too. The still air was pretty thick, the water was like glass and the cloudless sky- white-ish. It seemed clearer further from Split, say, much better around Mljet.
 
Last edited:
  • #17
fuzzyfelt said:
I wonder if there might have been forest fires or bushfires when visiting some summers ago, too. The still air was pretty thick, the water was like glass and the cloudless sky- white-ish. It seemed clearer further from Split, say, much better around Mljet.

My understanding is that fire is a part of the ecosystem around Mediterranean Sea, so it is quite possible. I was on Hvar for the fifth time - while this is the first I witnessed the fire in person, I have seen traces many times.
 
  • #18
I'd understood that about bushfires, I didn't realize it was the case around the Mediterranean too, thanks!
 
  • #19
Hot, dry, plenty of conifers - it must burn.
 
  • #20
Amazing photos.. Especially Not all paths are wooden is mind blowing.. Thanks for the share, keep going..
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #21
Spammer. Link removed. But as he already bumped the thread... :wink:
 
  • #22
Borek said:
The girl that you see is just picking her nose. Sigh. There are thousands of ways of wasting a picture.

You found her... our middle son's soul-mate! (glad the link got bumped again... I was thinking the season wasn't quite right...)
 
  • #23
Bar in Korčula - DD sized mermaids

IMG_1660.jpg


and a cat

IMG_1659.jpg
 
  • #24
Borek said:
Bar in Korčula - DD sized mermaids

IMG_1660.jpg

Lol!

and a cat

IMG_1659.jpg

Very cute! I like sleeping cats :!)
 
  • #25
I had a cat the looked just like that!

Always love your pictures Borek! Thank you for sharing. And those are some buxom mermaids. :biggrin:
 
  • #26
Evo said:
And those are some buxom mermaids. :biggrin:

The painting made me laugh, I just had to take picture :smile:
 
  • #27
I remember mermaids/sirens/syreny translation difficulties I caused once.
 
  • #28
Borek said:
I almost forgot - these pictures were taken especially for jtbell.

Oops, somehow I missed this originally, although I remember the thread. :blushing: I only saw it just now because someone posted spam at the end of the thread and I cleaned it up. Belated thanks. :smile:

Budapest trams - end stop:

IMG_3721.jpg


and inside - doors on both sides (closed on the left, open behind the man reading a newspaper):

IMG_3722.jpg


No idea about proper English nomenclature, but they can go in either direction (cabins for drivers on each end of the tram), so they don't need a rail loop at the end of line. No such trams in Warsaw, I am not sure if they are used in other Polish cities.

In the US, railfans usually call these "double-ended" versus "single-ended" for the ones that need a loop. I think over here only Boston, Philadelphia and Toronto still use single-ended trams. All three are remnants of old tram systems. The rest (mostly built in the modern era) are double-ended. Double-ended trams are more expensive because they need two complete sets of controls, but loops for single-ended ones cost money for the extra track and usually some land at the turnaround point, or even tunnels if they run underground.
 
  • #29
It doesn't end with pictures, EOS 7D can more than that. Shot in Split:

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Related to Summer pictures, or Boreks in Croatia (and Hungary)

1. What are Boreks in Croatia and Hungary?

Boreks are traditional pastries that are popular in Croatia and Hungary. They are made with flaky dough and filled with various ingredients, such as cheese, meat, or vegetables.

2. How are Boreks different from other pastries?

Boreks are typically made with filo or phyllo dough, which gives them a flaky and crispy texture. They are also often filled with savory ingredients, rather than sweet.

3. Are there different types of Boreks?

Yes, there are many different types of Boreks that vary in shape, size, and filling. Some common types include sirnica, filled with cheese, and zeljanica, filled with spinach.

4. Can Boreks be found in other countries besides Croatia and Hungary?

Yes, Boreks can be found in other Balkan countries, such as Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, and Macedonia. They may also be known by different names in these countries.

5. Are there any health benefits to eating Boreks?

Boreks are generally considered to be a high-calorie and high-fat food, so they should be consumed in moderation. However, they can also be a good source of protein and other nutrients, depending on the filling ingredients used.

Similar threads

Replies
19
Views
1K
Replies
1
Views
2K
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • General Discussion
3
Replies
79
Views
13K
  • General Discussion
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • General Discussion
Replies
5
Views
800
  • General Discussion
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • General Discussion
Replies
4
Views
715
Replies
59
Views
12K
  • General Discussion
Replies
16
Views
5K
Back
Top