Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

B The Earth's magnetic field and moon

  1. May 2, 2017 #1
    Does the moon pass through the Earth's magnetic field??
    If so how strong would the field be??
    Would it be strong enough to possibly generate a current throw some kind of conductor??
    And always thank you for anyone that take the time to answer my questions.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 2, 2017 #2

    phinds

    User Avatar
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    Have you done any research on this? If so, what have you found?
     
  4. May 2, 2017 #3
    Very little simply because for me with my reading disability it becomes very difficult to get through anything that is tiped out. Almost always have to have the computer read everthing to me. Most of the time I have to go throw the material 2-3 time before I understanding what it is trying to get across. Please do not think of me as unintelligent in anyway. This is why I have a tendency to ask questions on the forums then look into what is being described to me. I also like to ask questions to "someone" and not "something".
    When someone asks this are they trying to discourage wandering minds from asking questions ????
    what I have found was the moon enters the magnetotail three days before it is full and takes about six days to cross and exit on the other side. Other than that I do not know the answers to the rest of my questions.
     
  5. May 2, 2017 #4

    berkeman

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Sorry about your disability -- that must make learning pretty hard.

    And no, phinds was just asking what you had done so far. Also, what is your background? Are you familiar with Faraday's Law of Induction? That is part of what you would use to figure this out.
     
  6. May 2, 2017 #5

    berkeman

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

  7. May 2, 2017 #6

    phinds

    User Avatar
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    No. This forum is more about helping people FIND answers than it is about GIVING answers. There are many forums on the internet that are of the Q&A type (ask a question, get an answer) but this is not one of them, at least when it comes to questions for which something like a trivial Google search will turn up considerable information.

    The magnetotail is part of the Earth's magnetic field. ANY magnetic field is capable of creating some electric current if you move a closed loop of wire through it. The question really should be "would the current in this case be big enough to be measurable with current technology". I don't know the answer to that question.
     
  8. May 2, 2017 #7
    Well, even throw I drop out of high school( hence my user name) after my 4 year and only a 1 and 1/2 points short of graduating. I have pushed myself to keep learning about the world around me. Yes I'm some what familiar with the law and if I need to refresh my brain I can look that up for myself. The whole idea behind my questions was... Would it be possible or plausible to have the earth magnetosphere generate electricity on the moon for a moon base?

    P.S. I'm sorry I got so defensive.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2017
  9. May 2, 2017 #8

    phinds

    User Avatar
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    Even here on Earth, it would not be possible to use the the magnetosphere to generate significant electricity. If it were, we would likely already be doing it. On the moon, as I suggested previously, it might be too small to even measure.
     
  10. May 2, 2017 #9
    Thank you for taking the time to answer my queries on the subject :cool:
     
  11. May 4, 2017 #10

    sophiecentaur

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    No one seems to have mentioned that work has been done on a small scale version of this. It's called a Space Tether and involves two satellites, tethered together by a long (hundreds of metres or more). As they orbit through the Earth's magnetic field, a current is generated. Unfortunately there hasn't been a lot of success so far and there have been a number of failures. But Google "Space Tethers' to find something that could be interesting for you.
     
  12. May 5, 2017 #11
    Thank you for the info i'll look into it
     
  13. May 5, 2017 #12
    As a warning device, a 'flip magnetometer' would serve, literally a pivoted coil plus indicator. Getting more than nano-power from the sweep of Earth's magneto-tail, even wiggled by solar storms, seems improbable. IIRC, even miles-long mass-drivers would not need to worry about induced currents.

    Neat notion, though ! Good to see some-one thinking 'Outside the Box' !!
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: The Earth's magnetic field and moon
  1. If Earth was a moon? (Replies: 7)

Loading...