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This may seem like a very strange question

  1. Mar 19, 2006 #1
    I'm attempting to create a quiz with the first 8 answers with the possible answers of any of up, down, left, and right... From doing research, I understand this is possible for quantum mechanic problems in reguards to spin. Is this true? I would like to make a believeable college level simple quiz/test that has these answer possibilities for the first 8 question. Please let me know, thanks.
     
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  3. Mar 21, 2006 #2

    Meir Achuz

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    For spin in QM, there is only M_S, which is the spin projection along a chosen axis. This makes "left" and "right" hard to define.
     
  4. Mar 26, 2006 #3
    What about left-handed and right-handed spin-1/2 particles? Possible question: what is the handedness of the (electron) neutrino?
     
  5. Mar 30, 2006 #4

    Meir Achuz

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    By convention, "right-handed" for a particle's spin means that the "helicity" is positive (and v-v for LH). Helicity equals the component of a particle's spin along the direction of its momentum. The reason for this designation is probably that, in classical terminology, positive angular momentum component corresponds to right-handed rotation. Even though there is no rotation in the QM spin of an elementary particle, the notation is still used.

    The "handedness" of a particle is a bit more involved. It refers to the way the particle interacts in weak interactions. Electrons and neutrinos in beta decay come out with negative helicity and are said to be intrinsically "left-handed". Postrons and antineutrinos are said to be "right-handed".
     
  6. Mar 31, 2006 #5
    Actually I offered these questions only as example questions for Tjen's quizz. Didn't mean to get an answer!
     
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