Those With Science Backgrounds Are Good Spellers

  • Thread starter morrobay
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In summary, those with science backgrounds can spell as well as those with non-science backgrounds, at the same formal education level. However, those with science backgrounds may be more likely to have good spelling skills.
  • #1

morrobay

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Null hypothesis, Ho Those with science backgrounds can spell as well as those with non-science backgrounds, at the same formal education level. Only looking for opinions not a p-value.
 
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  • #2
Don't know. I can smell good, though.
 
  • #3
Probably true, but only if you average over education that doesn't require you to write much, e.g. music degree.
 
  • #4
In my experience, good spelling correlates strongly with conscientious attention to detail in general.

This can lead to success in many areas, including science.
 
  • #5
Einstein was a horrible speller. After moving to the US, Einstein became completely bilingual but could never recall how to spell words correctly in both German and English.
He was good at science.
 
  • #6
I have a hard time spelling English words because I pronounce everything with a Spanish accent. I have a hard time spelling Spanish words because I basically stopped writing in Spanish at the age of 10. I am just terrible at life =[.
 
  • #7
I'm one of the worst spellers IMO. I know what it's like not being able to hear at a young age and trying to figure out how to spell.

Abstract

Children with unilateral hearing loss have been considered to have few, if any, communication or academic difficulties. This study was designed to evaluate the academic achievement, cognitive ability, psycholinguistic, and social skills of a group of 25 monaurally hearing-impaired compared with 25 nonhearing-impaired children. Results indicated no significant differences between the two groups on cognitive or self-concept measures. However, the unilateral group had significantly lower scores on academic tests of word recognition, spelling, and language. The unilateral group was more likely to have repeated a grade, needed special education resource help, or additional tutoring in school. Within the unilateral group, children with severe-to-profound hearing loss had significantly lower WISC-R full scale I.Q.s as compared to the group with mild-to-moderate hearing loss. The results of this study suggest that monaural deafness, especially when severe to profound, may be associated with cognitive and academic deficits, as well as secondary behavioral adjustment problems.

(C) Williams & Wilkins 1986. All Rights Reserved.

http://journals.lww.com/ear-hearing/Abstract/1986/02000/Children_with_Unilateral_Sensorineural_Hearing.7.aspx
 
  • #9
My life would be vastly different without spell-check.
 
  • #10
OmCheeto said:
I love Miss Pelling.

See: spacemites

and her sister, who coined the phrase; "a cute little angle"

:wink:
Well, I found ways to remember the correct spelling of certain words. e.g.

weird.png


http://theoatmeal.com/comics/misspelling
 
  • #11
MarneMath said:
I have a hard time spelling English words because I pronounce everything with a Spanish accent. I have a hard time spelling Spanish words because I basically stopped writing in Spanish at the age of 10.

Opposite for me, and I'm a Spanish national. If I speak English, I pass for a yank wherever I go. But even though my writing in Spanish is decent, my colloquial Spanish has always been slightly weird to most people as I generally think up statements in English first.
 
  • #12
dipole said:
My life would be vastly different without spell-check.
Lol... my life became vastly different with spell-check.

http://www.jir.com/pullet.html



OCR... :biggrin:
 
  • #13
morrobay said:
Null hypothesis, Ho Those with science backgrounds can spell as well as those with non-science backgrounds, at the same formal education level. Only looking for opinions not a p-value.

Actually the Null hypothesis is a challenge - to try and show that the Ho
statement is wrong, to overturn it. By testing it statistically in order answer an underlying
question: In the above Ho you want to show that science majors are poor
spellers compared to non- science majors. Because maybe and in my opinion good spelling is not a priority for them.
 

1. Why are those with science backgrounds typically good spellers?

Individuals with science backgrounds have been exposed to complex scientific terminology and have developed a strong understanding of the rules and patterns of language. Additionally, scientific fields require precise and accurate communication, leading to a greater emphasis on spelling and grammar.

2. Can a person with a non-science background become a good speller?

Yes, anyone can become a good speller with practice and dedication. While a science background may provide an advantage, it is not the sole determining factor for spelling ability.

3. Are there any specific scientific fields that contribute to better spelling skills?

Research has shown that individuals in fields such as biology, chemistry, and physics tend to have strong spelling skills due to the technical and precise nature of these disciplines.

4. How can having good spelling skills benefit a person with a science background?

Having good spelling skills can enhance written communication, allowing scientists to effectively convey complex ideas and data. It can also improve credibility and professionalism in the scientific community.

5. Is there a correlation between intelligence and good spelling skills in individuals with science backgrounds?

While spelling skills may be an indicator of intelligence, there is no direct correlation between the two. Many factors, such as education, practice, and exposure to language, can also contribute to spelling ability in individuals with science backgrounds.

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