Three astronauts equipped with jetpacks

  • Thread starter p14r
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In summary, three astronauts equipped with jetpacks are pushing a satellite, having a mass of 121kg, through space. The forces being exerted on the satellite are F1=31.8N at an angle of 31.0 degrees above the horizontal (θ1), F2=40.0N at 60.2 degrees below the horizontal (θ2), and F3=54.7N along the horizontal. By calculating the net forces in the x and y directions, we find that the magnitude of the satellite's acceleration is 0.85 m/s^2. However, the answer should be given as a positive value since magnitudes are unsigned.
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Three astronauts equipped with jetpacks are pushing a satellite, having a mass of 121kg, through space. The forces being exerted on the satellite are F1=31.8N at an angle of 31.0 degrees above the horizontal (θ1), F2=40.0N at 60.2 degrees below the horizontal (θ2), and F3=54.7N along the horizontal.

What is the magnitude of the satellite's acceleration?

So I tried to solve it by adding all the FnetX, and Fnet Y

Fnet x= 31.8 cos 31 + 54.7 + 40.0 cos 60.2
= 27.2579 + 54.7 + 19.8789584
= 101.8368786 N

Fnet y= 31.8 sin 31 - 40.0 sin 60.2
= 16.37821 - 34.71061813
= -18.332408 N

tan θ = 101.8368786 / -18.332408
θ = -79.79506177

sin θ = Fnet x/ Fnet
sin (-79.79506177) = 101.8368786/ Fnet
Fnet = -103.47 N

Fnet = ma
a = Fnet/m
a = -103.4737987 N/121 kg
a = -0.85 m/s^2

But apparently it's wrong, can someone help please?
 
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  • #2
p14r said:
Fnet = ma
a = Fnet/m
a = -103.4737987 N/121 kg
a = -0.85 m/s^2

But apparently it's wrong, can someone help please?
Did you include the minus sign in your answer? They wanted the magnitude of the acceleration.
 
  • #3
Yup i did, so i shouldn't enter the negative sign?
 
  • #4
p14r said:
Yup i did, so i shouldn't enter the negative sign?
No you shouldn't. Magnitudes are unsigned.
 
  • #5
It worked, thank you so much!
 

1. What is the purpose of equipping astronauts with jetpacks?

The purpose of equipping astronauts with jetpacks is to allow them to move freely and independently in space, outside of their spacecraft or space station. This is especially useful for performing spacewalks or repairing equipment.

2. How do jetpacks work in space?

Jetpacks use compressed gas, usually nitrogen, to propel the astronaut through space. The gas is released through small nozzles, creating thrust and allowing the astronaut to move in any direction.

3. Can jetpacks be used on any planet?

Jetpacks can only be used in environments with an atmosphere, as the gas needs something to push against in order to create thrust. Therefore, they cannot be used on planets without an atmosphere, such as the Moon or Mars.

4. How long can jetpacks be used for?

The duration of jetpack use depends on the amount of compressed gas available. This can vary depending on the size and design of the jetpack, as well as the task being performed. However, most jetpacks have a limited fuel supply and can only be used for a short period of time.

5. Are jetpacks safe for astronauts to use?

Jetpacks undergo rigorous testing and are designed with safety in mind. They are equipped with emergency shut-off valves and astronauts receive extensive training on how to use them properly. While there are some risks associated with jetpack use, they are generally considered safe for astronauts to use.

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