Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Too trashy for Crook - Book banning

  1. Jan 16, 2009 #1

    Ivan Seeking

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    http://www.oregonlive.com/news/index.ssf/2008/12/crook_county_removes_book_from.html
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 16, 2009 #2
    Leading scientists agree, you'll go blind.
     
  4. Jan 16, 2009 #3
    You only go blind once but can enjoy masturbation thousands of times. In fact I'm enjoying whoa, who turned out the lights?
     
  5. Jan 16, 2009 #4
    Actually when I first saw this book I thought it was inappropriate. "Dora explores her sexuality" by Dora the Explorer. Chapter One: What happened to Flashlight's batteries? Chapter Two: Look what's inside Backpack Chapter Three: Find the little man in the Canoe.
     
  6. Jan 16, 2009 #5
    Just for clarity, there is a difference between banning the book, and removing it from the curriculum. The thread title is a little misleading.
     
  7. Jan 16, 2009 #6
  8. Jan 16, 2009 #7

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Agreed. And I'll go further that put in historical context: there is nothing any school district can ever do to "ban" a book. Use of that word is inappropriate.
     
  9. Jan 16, 2009 #8
    Just a redneck. Plenty in Prineville too.
     
  10. Jan 16, 2009 #9

    Gokul43201

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    But the term "book banning" is widely prevalent, even in the context of schools and school districts.

    http://712educators.about.com/cs/bannedbooks/a/bookbanning.htm

    It seems this person is contradicting your assertion. Do we have a conflict of having definitions here?

    How is the word 'ban" being used in these places, for instance?


    http://www.nytimes.com/library/cyber/nation/082297nation-list.html


    http://www.sptimes.com/News/012800/Hillsborough/School_shelves_orders.shtml

    Useful reading can be had in the USSC's decision in the Pico case. The decision was 5-4 against banning books in school libraries.

    Here are the majority and minority opinions: http://www.firstamendmentschools.org/resources/handout1a.aspx?id=13965

    Both groups, however, seem to agree that the school shouldn't remove books from the library for ideological reasons, if there isn't say, a public library in the neighborhood that carries said book.

    So anyway, following the Pico case, school districts may not ban books from school libraries, but it appears to happen all the time, nevertheless (perhaps until challenged in court?).
     
  11. Jan 16, 2009 #10
    In this case, there is no mention in the article linked to about removing the book from the library, only from classrooms and the curriculum. The word "banning" in the title is still misleading (Unless Ivan has further evidence)
     
  12. Jan 16, 2009 #11

    FredGarvin

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Symantics aside, the fact that a single parent can cause such a wholesale change in a high school's curriculum is disturbing.
     
  13. Jan 16, 2009 #12
    Even more disturbing is that the school didn't tell him to go **** himself.

    This is what's wrong with education these days: parents have too much of a say and too many of them are mentally deficient in some way. My sister, a teacher, once had a parent come up to her and asked her to stop assigning reading and writing assignments. In an English class.
     
  14. Jan 16, 2009 #13

    Gokul43201

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I did not disagree with this. The thing I was disagreeing with was Russ' statement that a school/school district can not even ban books. And even there, the conflict is only between the use of 'can' as opposed to 'may'.
     
  15. Jan 16, 2009 #14

    Ivan Seeking

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    A book may be banned from the curriculum. The error made by careless readers is to apply the word in a broader context.
     
  16. Jan 16, 2009 #15

    Ivan Seeking

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    But that would mean actually discussing the point of the thread.

    ...the point of the thread. I'm glad that you, Gokul, S&S, and Binzing, could keep up. :biggrin:
     
  17. Jan 16, 2009 #16

    chemisttree

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    It was a committee!

    What do you have against single parents?
     
  18. Jan 16, 2009 #17

    LowlyPion

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    This would be why so many people wear glasses?
     
  19. Jan 16, 2009 #18

    Ivan Seeking

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    And the committee agreed to allow it, but it was a non-binding decision.
     
  20. Jan 16, 2009 #19

    chemisttree

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Are you sure you are interpreting the Pico case correctly? In the second part of the majority opinion, it is stated:
    Thus the case is only applicable if the Board were to remove the book from the library not the curriculum.
     
  21. Jan 16, 2009 #20

    chemisttree

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    The committee agreed to allow 'it'? By 'it' do you mean removal or it's continued use in the classroom?
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Too trashy for Crook - Book banning
  1. Ban water (Replies: 6)

  2. Ban me (Replies: 22)

  3. Banning ideas (Replies: 34)

Loading...