Trying to Understand the 1928 article by Raman on Nature

In summary, the conversation is discussing two doubts regarding an article published in 1928 by Raman on his discovery of the Raman effect. The first doubt is about the meaning of "modified scattering" and its correspondence to fluctuations in Compton effect. The second doubt is about the feebleness of the effect compared to ordinary scattering and its indication that it is a true scattering and not simple fluorescence. The article being cited is "A new type of secondary radiation" and the authors, Raman and Krishnan, are referring to their "modified scattering" as inelastic scattering and "normal scattering" as elastic scattering. The main argument is about polarization being used as an empirical proof for their interpretation of "modified scattering" as an inelastic
  • #1
Salmone
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I have two doubts about the article Raman published in 1928 on Nature when he discovered Raman effect, precisely about these two sentences he wrote:1.
If we assume that the X-ray scattering of the "unmodified" type observed by Prof. Compton corresponds to the normal or average state of the atoms and molecules, while the "modified" scattering of altered wave-length corresponds to their fluctuations from that state, it would follow that...

What does it mean the modified scattering corresponds to their fluctuations in Compton effect? I think he's talking about the radiation undergoing Compton scattering that is re-emitted at a lower frequency but why does it correspond to fluctuations? What was he talking about?

2. When he proves that the radiation emitted after Raman effect can't be simple fluorescence he says that:

That the effect is a true scattering and not a fluorescence is indicated in the first place by its feebleness in comparison with the ordinary scattering, and secondly...

What did he mean by "its flebleness in comparison with ordinary scattering"? That fluorescence is less or more intense of scattering? Something like this?

The article I'm citing is "A new type of secondary radiation" appeared on Nature-March 31, 1928.
 
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  • #2
I think Raman and Krishnan simply refer to the fact that their "modified scattering" is the inelastic scattering of a photon on an atom or molecule, while the "normal scattering" refers to elastic scattering.
 
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  • #3
vanhees71 said:
I think Raman and Krishnan simply refer to the fact that their "modified scattering" is the inelastic scattering of a photon on an atom or molecule, while the "normal scattering" refers to elastic scattering.
It does make sense, can you help me also with question 2?
 
  • #4
This one I also haven't understood. I think the main argument is the one about polarization as an empirical proof that their interpretation of their "modified scattering" as an inelastic scattering process is correct.
 
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Related to Trying to Understand the 1928 article by Raman on Nature

1. What is the significance of Raman's 1928 article in Nature?

The 1928 article by Raman in Nature is significant because it introduced the concept of the Raman effect, which is the inelastic scattering of light by molecules. This discovery led to the development of Raman spectroscopy, a powerful analytical tool for identifying and characterizing chemical compounds.

2. What is the Raman effect?

The Raman effect is the inelastic scattering of light by molecules. When a beam of light passes through a substance, some of the photons interact with the molecules and are scattered in different directions. The scattered light contains information about the molecular structure and can be used to identify and characterize chemical compounds.

3. How did Raman discover the Raman effect?

Raman discovered the Raman effect while studying the scattering of light by various substances. He noticed that some substances scattered light at different wavelengths than the incident light, which was unexpected according to classical physics. Through further experimentation, he determined that this was due to the inelastic scattering of light by molecules, which became known as the Raman effect.

4. What is Raman spectroscopy?

Raman spectroscopy is a technique that uses the Raman effect to identify and characterize chemical compounds. It involves shining a beam of light on a sample and analyzing the scattered light to determine the molecular structure of the sample. Raman spectroscopy is widely used in various fields, including chemistry, biology, and materials science.

5. How has Raman spectroscopy impacted science and technology?

The discovery of the Raman effect and the development of Raman spectroscopy have had a significant impact on science and technology. It has become an essential tool for identifying and characterizing chemical compounds, and it has applications in various fields such as pharmaceuticals, forensics, and environmental monitoring. Raman spectroscopy has also led to advancements in instrumentation and techniques, making it a valuable tool for scientific research and industrial applications.

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