U.S. Solar Eclipses - Oct. 14, 2023 (Annular) & Apr. 08, 2024 (Total)

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In summary, the 2017 total eclipse was awesome and Americans should start working on their travel plans for the 2024 eclipse which will be even more amazing.
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Borg

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The 2017 total eclipse was awesome and we're going to get another opportunity at totality in the U.S in just over a year from now on Apr. 08, 2024. There will also be an annular eclipse on Oct. 14 this year. Time to start working on those travel plans before all of the hotels are gone. :smile:

First off, here's a good site with maps by state showing the path of the 2024 total eclipse. Each state map also has links to more detailed information about totality along the path and the cities in the path of totality.

The American Astronomical Society page here shows a map with median cloud that might be helpful in determining where to go. The bottom of that page lists some additional resources including one called eclipse2024.org that also looks interesting.

Tinally, here are some resources from NASA:
2023-2024_eclipse_map_1920.jpg
 
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You dirty rat, I was going to start this thread next week, on the T-minus one year mark.

I'm starting my planning (equipment inventory and upgrades) and eyeing Erie, PA for my trip.
 
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russ_watters said:
eyeing Erie, PA
Presque Isle State Park, that peninsula out in the lake?

If I do the trip, I'll probably stay in my home town in Ohio, which is near the edge of the totality zone, but only an hour's drive from the lake, someplace like Ashtabula or Conneaut or Geneva-on-the-Lake.
 
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I have a relative in Ohio who lives right on the edge of the totality line. That will probably be my base. When I drove home after 2017, I got stuck in a multi-hour traffic jam. Don't want to go through that again.
 
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If you have to travel, and need a place to stay, you already may have waited too late. I know that when we tried to book something for the last eclipse, even though it was over a year away by months, every place that could be booked was full. We did find one place that only booked a year in advance, so we marked it on the calendar, and made our reservation the instant they started taking them.
 
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Borg said:
The 2017 total eclipse was awesome and we're going to get another opportunity at totality in the U.S in just over a year from now on Apr. 08, 2024. There will also be an annular eclipse on Oct. 14 this year. Time to start working on those travel plans before all of the hotels are gone. :smile:
The centerline of the total eclipse (4/8/24) is going to pass within a few hundred yards of when I am currently sitting (downtown Cleve-town). Hoping there will be a viewing party similar to the partial eclipse a few years ago, in 2017. And, of course, hoping for clear skies :)
 
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1. What is a solar eclipse?

A solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the sun and the Earth, blocking all or part of the sun's light.

2. Why are the solar eclipses on Oct. 14, 2023 and Apr. 08, 2024 significant?

These eclipses are significant because they will be visible in the United States, providing a rare opportunity for people in the country to witness this celestial event.

3. What is the difference between an annular and a total solar eclipse?

An annular solar eclipse occurs when the moon is farther away from the Earth, making it appear smaller and not fully covering the sun, resulting in a "ring of fire" effect. A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon is closer to the Earth and fully covers the sun, resulting in complete darkness for a short period of time.

4. How often do solar eclipses occur?

Solar eclipses occur about every 18 months, but they are only visible in a specific region of the world each time.

5. Is it safe to look at a solar eclipse?

No, it is not safe to look directly at a solar eclipse without proper eye protection. The intense light from the sun can cause damage to the eyes. It is recommended to use proper eclipse glasses or to view the eclipse indirectly through a pinhole projector.

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