Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

UFO study finds no sign of aliens

  1. May 8, 2006 #1

    Ivan Seeking

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/4981720.stm

    It has long been suspected that this sort of thing may account for some UFO reports - perhaps a good number of the more interesting cases. Of course it remains to be shown that such a phenomenon really does exist that can affect humans to the degree suggested.

    Note also that the "UFO" photo chosen by the BBC was long ago relegated to our very own Ball Lightning [photos] section of the Credible Anomalies Napster.
    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=58374
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2006
  2. jcsd
  3. May 8, 2006 #2

    Ivan Seeking

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    In fact, I don't offer theories, but I do have one suggestion. If such a phenomenon does exist, it would appear to react to RADAR. I have always wondered if the Iran encounter might be explained if a phenomenon like that suggested here was encountered, and if it literally "ran away" from the plane's RADAR. Could the RADAR literally push it away as the plane chases it? To me, a careful reading of the encounter suggests such a possibility.
    http://www.nsa.gov/ufo/ufo00020.pdf

    I have read a good number of other reports that might be explained by this. In some cases, this could be what makes the UFOs seemingly intelligent and responsive.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2006
  4. May 8, 2006 #3

    selfAdjoint

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Gold Member
    Dearly Missed


    I believe that these plasmas, especially if they were organized into tori (as the recent theory of ball lightning suggests) or other soliton forms, would make brilliant radar targets. One thing very likely is that they would scatter cm wave lengths but not optical ones (or not as well), making them show up on radar but be effectively invisible to the naked eye.
     
  5. May 8, 2006 #4

    Curious3141

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    I would like to see this proved in a controlled experiment. In my experience, many people have walked by high tension lines and power generators, get MRIs and sightsee auroras with no weird effects being reported (these are all examples of exposure to strong electric/magnetic or electromagnetic fields). So, if "plasma related fields" are being blamed for these phenomena, I want to see proof by way of a reproducible experiment with controls (to rule out a placebo effect).
     
  6. May 8, 2006 #5

    Ivan Seeking

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    There are quite few cases of AF planes being scrambled to observe RADAR targets that were tracked, but could never be seen, even at close range - according to the relative positions of the interceptors and the target, as indicated on RADAR.
     
  7. May 8, 2006 #6
    So what percentage of credible cases does this explanation erase? Are there still a decent number of cases which remain immune to this type of explanation? BTW I don't expect exact answers, just a thought.
     
  8. May 9, 2006 #7

    Ivan Seeking

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Making a best guess wrt my own experience, I can imagine that this sort of thing might account for at least twenty percent of the most interesting cases that I've read; maybe more.
     
  9. May 10, 2006 #8

    Ivan Seeking

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    The topic is the alleged phenomenon that affects humans and the evidence that it may exist. All off-topic posts have been deleted.
     
  10. May 10, 2006 #9

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    So they're saying it's basically a hallucination? That doesn't seem to account for multiple observers seeing the same thing.

    Like Curious, I'd like to see some evidence of how this would affect the brain to produce this particular outcome. That just seems a bit far-fetched to me. If something external could have that profound of an effect on the brain, it should be measureable, repeatable, and I'd have a hard time believing it would be so specific and localized as to result in such a similar hallucination in so many people.

    It sounds a bit like a fancy way of saying, "It's all in their heads."

    Afterall, if it's so uncommon, as the article says, and it hasn't been measured directly, as the article hints, then it's nothing but handwaving.
     
  11. May 11, 2006 #10
    I'd half to agree with ya Moonbear, they would need to have some solid facts to back up the claims of hallucination. As far as I can recall, Ive never seen a study where a group of people were indused to have the SAME hallucination.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: UFO study finds no sign of aliens
  1. Ufo (Replies: 18)

  2. Aliens (Replies: 8)

Loading...