Unravelling the Mystery of the Huns

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In summary, the origin of the Huns is a mystery and subject of much debate. They are believed to have originated in the Steppes of Central Asia and may be a Turkic or proto-Turkic group. The Chinese referred to them as Hsiung-nu (Xiongnu), possibly an early reference to the Huns. The Huns had a significant impact on Eastern and Central Europe through their invasion and establishment of an empire, contributing to the decline of the Roman Empire. The Bulgars and Magyars are believed to be descended from the Huns, but the exact ancestry of the Huns is still uncertain. There is evidence that they may have originated from N or E Siberia.
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Astronuc
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The origin of the Huns is a mystery and subject of much debate. They originated in the Steppes of Central Asia as did other groups. There is evidence that they are a Turkic or proto-Turkic group. The Chinese (Qin) referred to Hsiung-nu (Xiongnu), and some/many consider this an early reference to the group(s) subsequently known as the Huns. The Huns had an enormous impact on Eastern and Central Europe based on their invasion, establishment of an empire in the area of the Danube and Hungarian Plain, and military predation which pressured other ethnic groups to move west or submit. The Hunnic presence in Europe seems to have contributed significantly to the destabilization and decline of the Roman Empire.

Here is one site on the Huns -
http://www.historyfiles.co.uk/FeaturesEurope/BarbarianHuns.htm

The Bulgars (who settle in modern day Bulgaria) and Maygars (who settled in modern day Hungary) may be descended from the group lead by Attila.
http://www.historyfiles.co.uk/KingListsEurope/EasternBulgaria.htm
http://www.historyfiles.co.uk/KingListsEurope/EasternHungary.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xiongnu
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qin_Dynasty
 
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  • #2
Isn't Atilla the Hun the guy who ripped apart his enemies's hands??
 
  • #3
Phy6explorer said:
Isn't Atilla the Hun the guy who ripped apart his enemies's hands??
Not sure, but if one crossed him, one's head was likely to turn up on a post. The warring tribes back then had rather nasty practices.
 
  • #4
I was taught that all invasions from central Asia including Mongol and Khan were Turkic tribes seeking grasslands for their horses and other animals to graze. Hungary definitely descends from Huns, it is in their name and the same with Bulgaria.
 
  • #5
Magyars are the ancestors of Hungarians, but certain the Huns settled on the Hungarian plane during the 5th cent. Bulgarians are related to Bulgars, but there are other ethnic tribes mixed in. The Goths/Scythians were settled there before the arrival of the Huns, and preceding the Huns were various groups including the Alans, Avars, Samartians (Persian speaking), . . . .

The ancestry of the Huns is still up in the air. They could have Turkic orgins same or similar to Uighurs/Uyghurs, one of the Altai groups. There is a group call Hsiung-Nu (Xiongnu), which might be earlier Turkic group related to Huns. Then there is a possibility of origin from N or E Siberia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xiongnu#Northern_Xiongnu_becoming_the_Huns

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulgars

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magyars

I'm still trying to sort out who, from where, and when.
 

What were the origins of the Huns?

The origins of the Huns have been a subject of debate among historians and archaeologists. Some theories suggest that they originated from Central Asia, while others propose a connection to the Xiongnu people of Mongolia. However, recent genetic studies have suggested that the Huns may have had a diverse origin, with possible ties to both Central Asia and Eastern Europe.

What role did the Huns play in the fall of the Roman Empire?

The Huns had a significant impact on the decline of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century. They launched numerous raids and invasions, putting pressure on the already weakened Roman Empire. Their attacks also caused mass migrations of other barbarian tribes, further contributing to the empire's downfall.

Were the Huns a unified and organized group?

There is no clear consensus among scholars on the level of organization and unity within the Hunnic society. Some believe that they were a highly organized and centralized group, while others argue that they were a loose confederation of tribes with a strong leader. The lack of written records and the limited archaeological evidence make it challenging to determine the true nature of the Hunnic society.

What was the role of Attila the Hun in their history?

Attila the Hun is one of the most famous and controversial figures in Hunnic history. He was a powerful ruler who led many successful military campaigns and expanded the Hunnic empire. However, his brutal tactics and reputation as the "Scourge of God" have also been heavily criticized. Attila's death in 453 AD marked the beginning of the decline of the Hunnic empire.

What ultimately led to the downfall of the Huns?

The exact reasons for the fall of the Huns are still a subject of debate. Some scholars suggest that internal conflicts and succession struggles after Attila's death weakened the empire. Others argue that the Huns were overextended and unable to sustain their conquests. The decisive defeat by the Franks at the Battle of Catalaunian Plains in 451 AD is also considered a significant factor in their decline.

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