Using a two stroke to power an air hammer

  • Thread starter rmedeiros
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In summary, the person is thinking of using a small two stroke engine to power an air hammer. They are unsure about how much pressure the engine will produce and whether or not it will stall out. They are also concerned about the weight limit and whether or not the engine will be able to power itself.
  • #1
rmedeiros
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Hello everyone,

I was wondering if anyone could give me some insight on using a small two stroke engine to power an air hammer? My idea is to use the exhaust gases from the engine and then regulate down the CFM for the air hammer without stalling out the engine.

I was wondering if I could weld a T connection at the stinger of the exhaust pipe going down here is an example drawing http://img705.imageshack.us/i/32094421.jpg/ and then from the regulator to the air hammer.

What do you guys think?
 
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  • #2
Why not just couple an air compressor to the engine's crankshaft?
 
  • #3
I can't imagine getting any usable pressure out of it. I think the air/fuel mixture would become too diluted by backed-up exhaust, or would gradually fail to flow through the transfer ports.
 
  • #4
Mech_Engineer said:
Why not just couple an air compressor to the engine's crankshaft?

I apologize I didn't really explain myself, I'm trying to maintain a 15 lb max limit and it has to power itself so I figured the best way to go about doing this is chemical power.

Mech_Engineer said:
I can't imagine getting any usable pressure out of it. I think the air/fuel mixture would become too diluted by backed-up exhaust, or would gradually fail to flow through the transfer ports.

Thats another thing i wasn't to sure about was pressure. I did a quick Google search and I believe I saw that a 20cc engine puts out almost 300 CFM or more. But I am curious if I T into the exhaust pipe in anyway will it have too much pressure and stall the motor out?

I was just wondering if it could possibly be feasible without producing a major headache. I figured if back pressure could spin a turbo it could maybe move the piston in the hand held air hammer, it was just a thought.
 

Related to Using a two stroke to power an air hammer

1. How does a two stroke engine work?

A two stroke engine works by completing a power cycle in two strokes of the piston, instead of the four strokes in a traditional engine. In the first stroke, the piston moves down and sucks in a fuel and air mixture. In the second stroke, the piston moves up and compresses the mixture, creating a spark to ignite it. This explosion forces the piston back down and powers the engine.

2. Why is a two stroke engine commonly used for powering tools like an air hammer?

A two stroke engine is commonly used for powering tools like an air hammer because it is lightweight, compact, and has a high power-to-weight ratio. This makes it easy to handle and maneuver, while still providing enough power to drive the tool.

3. How is a two stroke engine different from a four stroke engine?

A two stroke engine is different from a four stroke engine in the number of strokes required to complete a power cycle. A four stroke engine requires an intake stroke, compression stroke, power stroke, and exhaust stroke, while a two stroke engine only requires an intake and compression stroke to complete a power cycle.

4. What are the benefits of using a two stroke engine for an air hammer?

The benefits of using a two stroke engine for an air hammer include its compact size, lightweight design, and high power output. It also requires less maintenance and has fewer moving parts, making it more reliable and easier to repair.

5. Are there any disadvantages to using a two stroke engine for an air hammer?

One disadvantage of using a two stroke engine for an air hammer is that it can be more difficult to control the power output compared to a four stroke engine. It also tends to produce more emissions and can be noisier. Additionally, the fuel and oil mixture required for a two stroke engine can be more expensive than regular fuel for a four stroke engine.

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