Validity of a paper on the standard conclusions from Bell, etc

In summary, the paper in question is questioning the popular explanation of entanglement where the quantum information of an entangled two-particle system changes without regard to the distance between the two particles. However, the paper was outdated at the time of publication as there have been recent experiments that provide unambiguous evidence of entanglement between single photons at large separations. Therefore, it can be considered of historical interest rather than a valid argument against entanglement.
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nomadreid

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In most popular explanations of entanglement, the quantum information of an entangled two-particle system changes without regard to the distance between the two particles. The following paper seems (to my unprofessional eye) to be questioning this interpretation
https://www.cambridge.org/core/serv..._fiction_how_wrong_was_einstein_after_all.pdf
As it was published in Cambridge Press, I presume that it has some merit, but perhaps an eye better trained than mine could glance at it and hazard a judgement as to the validity of the author's doubts? Thanks.
 
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nomadreid said:
In most popular explanations of entanglement, the quantum information of an entangled two-particle system changes without regard to the distance between the two particles. The following paper seems (to my unprofessional eye) to be questioning this interpretation
https://www.cambridge.org/core/serv..._fiction_how_wrong_was_einstein_after_all.pdf
As it was published in Cambridge Press, I presume that it has some merit, but perhaps an eye better trained than mine could glance at it and hazard a judgement as to the validity of the author's doubts? Thanks.

I don't follow the author's premise.

Similarly, no experiment seems yet to provide unambiguous evidence of remaining entanglement between single photons at large separations in absence of mutual interaction, or about immediate (superluminal) communication. ... The author suggests an experiment to decide whether or not photons may be entangled when no longer in field contact with each other.

I am not sure what Norden is trying to say with the above, as the phrases can mean different things to different people. "Unambiguous"? All the experiments I reference are pretty unambiguous. Large separations? There have been some pretty large separations, how large is large? Recent experiments are referenced, but a number of key ones are omitted. For example:

1. Swapping of entanglement - the entangled photons never interact.
2. Creation of entangled pairs from independent (separated) sources.
 
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nomadreid said:
In most popular explanations of entanglement, the quantum information of an entangled two-particle system changes without regard to the distance between the two particles. The following paper seems (to my unprofessional eye) to be questioning this interpretation
https://www.cambridge.org/core/serv..._fiction_how_wrong_was_einstein_after_all.pdf
As it was published in Cambridge Press, I presume that it has some merit, but perhaps an eye better trained than mine could glance at it and hazard a judgement as to the validity of the author's doubts? Thanks.
The paper is suggesting that there might be subluminal interaction responsible for entanglement.
But the paper was outdated at the moment of publication. There were three loophole free experiment results published in 2015:
http://arxiv.org/abs/1508.05949
http://arxiv.org/abs/1511.03189
http://arxiv.org/abs/1511.03190
 
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Thanks, zonde and DrChinese. I can therefore shelve the paper into "at best of historical interest".
 

1. What is the purpose of determining the validity of a paper on standard conclusions from Bell and other studies?

The purpose of determining validity in a scientific paper is to ensure that the methods and conclusions presented are reliable and accurately reflect the findings of the study. This helps to build confidence in the results and allows for further research to be based on solid evidence.

2. How is the validity of a paper determined?

The validity of a paper is determined through a rigorous process of peer review, where experts in the field critically evaluate the methodology, data analysis, and conclusions of the study. This process helps to identify any flaws or biases in the study and ensure that the findings are supported by evidence.

3. What is the role of Bell's theorem in evaluating the validity of a paper?

Bell's theorem is a fundamental concept in quantum mechanics that helps to test the validity of theories and experiments related to quantum entanglement and non-locality. It provides a framework for evaluating the consistency and completeness of results, and its application can strengthen the validity of a paper's conclusions.

4. Can a paper's conclusions be valid even if they differ from the standard conclusions from Bell and other studies?

Yes, a paper's conclusions can still be valid even if they differ from standard conclusions from previous studies. Science is a constantly evolving field, and new research may challenge or expand upon existing theories. However, it is important for the paper to provide evidence and reasoning to support its conclusions.

5. What are the consequences of a paper being deemed invalid?

If a paper is deemed invalid, it means that its conclusions are not supported by sufficient evidence or that there are flaws in the study's methodology. This can impact the credibility of the research and may prevent it from being published in reputable journals. It may also hinder further research based on the paper's findings.

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