What is a 3-faced 3-D object?

EnumaElish

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
2,273
123
Is there a 3-D object with 3 faces? What is it called?
 
529
0
My mind cant comprehend the existence of such a shape :redface:
 
116
0
Thats like asking for a 2 sided 2D object.
 
694
2
A politician?
 

disregardthat

Science Advisor
1,840
33
A cylinder? Or must the faces be flat..?
 
27,180
3,814
No such object exists with flat sides.
 
1,699
5
three lines can only intersect in one point, coincide or be parallel so yes, no such object exists.
 

Gib Z

Homework Helper
3,345
2
There is an infinite number of 3 dimensional objects with 3 faces, just as there are an infinite number 2 dimensional objects with 2 sides.
 
352
0
A tetrahedron with its base removed?
 
1,422
1
There is an infinite number of 3 dimensional objects with 3 faces, just as there are an infinite number 2 dimensional objects with 2 sides.
Playing Captain Obvious these days? :tongue2:
 

EnumaElish

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
2,273
123
A cylinder? Or must the faces be flat..?
Good answer; but I was asking about flat surfaces. I understand that no such object exists. Is there a theorem about the min. number of flat surfaces that a 3-D object must have?
 
1,422
1
I think it's best we first clarify what a closed 3 dimensional object is for our purposes. I would say that a simple closed 3 dimensional object is a collection of planar surfaces with properties among which is that a surface in that collection connects to at least as many surfaces as it has vertices. The simplest planar figure is the triangle; since it has 3 sides, it is not possible to meet the said property with only 3 planar faces, hence there is no such 3 dimensional object.
 
Last edited:

Gib Z

Homework Helper
3,345
2
A tetrahedron with its base removed?
Getting the right idea =] No one had stated the shape has to be closed.
 
Good answer; but I was asking about flat surfaces. I understand that no such object exists. Is there a theorem about the min. number of flat surfaces that a 3-D object must have?
Hello,

What you are thinking of is a 3 dimensional (convex) polytope. I assume you mean codimension 1 faces (i.e. 2 dimensional faces). Technically, edges and vertices are also called faces. In this case, the minimum number of faces is 4 (a tetrahedron). In general, an n dimensional polytope needs to have at least n+1 facets.
 
86
0
Hello,

What you are thinking of is a 3 dimensional (convex) polytope. I assume you mean codimension 1 faces (i.e. 2 dimensional faces). Technically, edges and vertices are also called faces. In this case, the minimum number of faces is 4 (a tetrahedron). In general, an n dimensional polytope needs to have at least n+1 facets.
Darn, I was going to say that. Furthermore, when you consider the convex hull of this polytope, the convex hull can extend in two dimensions; but there needs to be at least one point above the plane of the other points in order to achieve what you desire. Otherwise it's simply a 2-dimensional face.
 

mgb_phys

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
7,660
11
Wouldn't a Mobius strip have 3 faces? ie. 1 'face' and 2 edges.
 

dst

375
0
Wouldn't a Mobius strip have 3 faces? ie. 1 'face' and 2 edges.
Good thinking. Why wouldn't it? Make the edges thicker = 3 faces.

But obviously no flat surfaced object could have 3 faces. (politicians aside)
 
Are there geometries where such an object could be constructed or is that a silly question to ask?
 
Wouldn't a Mobius strip have 3 faces? ie. 1 'face' and 2 edges.
It only has 1 'face' and 1 edge though. And a Möbius strip is 2-dimensional (as a manifold).
 

The Physics Forums Way

We Value Quality
• Topics based on mainstream science
• Proper English grammar and spelling
We Value Civility
• Positive and compassionate attitudes
• Patience while debating
We Value Productivity
• Disciplined to remain on-topic
• Recognition of own weaknesses
• Solo and co-op problem solving
Top