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What is exactly meant by wave nature,does the particle move like a

  1. Jul 30, 2010 #1
    what is exactly meant by wave nature,does the particle move like a wave or it moves along path of a wave or something other?(talking about macro sized particles)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 30, 2010 #2
    Re: wave-particle

    Hi there,

    This is probably one of the most difficult concept to grab at first.

    Einstein, Schrödinger, and others have shown that matter and energy is very closely related. From the most famous equation from Einstein E=mc2, you can see that matter can be transformed to energy, and vice-versa. Ok, for now no problem. We can see the difference between matter and energy.

    But what can also come from this and other equation is that matter, sometimes, behaves like energy (or a photon), and that energy, sometimes, behaves like matter. This dual behavior only shows that to be able to completely understand and model different events, we need to consider one or the other or both.

    Hope this helps. Cheers
     
  4. Jul 30, 2010 #3
    Re: wave-particle

    can u suggest me a book? I did end my+2 grade with lotmany doubts in this area
     
  5. Jul 30, 2010 #4
    Re: wave-particle

    Well surely this shows that matter and energy is one and the same? :)
     
  6. Jul 30, 2010 #5
    Re: wave-particle

    Hi there,

    Not one, but that there is a duality principle. From my understanding, this implies that both can be used to explain the behavior of nature.

    But they are very different otherwise, from one another.

    Cheers
     
  7. Jul 30, 2010 #6
    Re: wave-particle

    Obviously they are different... one is a condensed energy that forms the structures of matter whilst the other is a energy not in a condensed state. Yet they are ultimately the same. Duality principle only exist when you choose to address the state of energy either as energy or as matter. In truth there is no duality as both are one and the same thing.
     
  8. Jul 30, 2010 #7
    Re: wave-particle

    what is exactly meant by behaving like a wave explain it a little more elaborate manner?
     
  9. Jul 30, 2010 #8
    Re: wave-particle

    OK. think of a particle whilst its stationery... what do you see? a stationery particle, right? Now think of this particle setting off on a jouney to a distant galaxy. So lets say it's going to travel from Galaxy A to Galaxy B. When it arrives at Galaxy B it becomes a stationery particle again because it occupies a given space, yet whilst travelling from Galaxy A and Galaxy B is was in a state of wave-function. Why? because between Galaxy A and Galaxy B it was 'moving' which prevented it from attaining a given point in space-time that could be measured and calculated. Thus a particle is only a particle when it is stationery, because it occupies a given space-time that can be measured. When it's not a particle it is a wave because it can be anywhere, there is NO SET point that it occupies. When you go a step further, it is neither the wave or the particle and it's both. Tricky? lol
     
  10. Jul 30, 2010 #9
    Re: wave-particle

    what is exactly meant by wave nature,does the particle move like a wave or it moves along path of a wave or something other?(talking about macro sized particles)
     
  11. Jul 30, 2010 #10
    Re: wave-particle

    came back to the first question again!!!!!
     
  12. Jul 30, 2010 #11
    Re: wave-particle

    prudhvi mohan, Andrey answered your question already. You might not have gotten what he meant, so I'll try to rephrase.

    I'll use photons for this, rather than just the term particle. When a photon travels through space it travels in a wave. The exact position of the photon in unknown. We can determine a probable range of locations of the photon. Once the photon strikes something, for example a piece of photographic paper, the wave collapses and the exact position can be determined.

    We use both the wave and the particle descriptions because individually neither description accurately describes our observations.
     
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