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What's the highest energy produced in an accelerator?

  1. Sep 17, 2006 #1
    What's the current maximum particle energy we can produce on earth?

    Also, what is the maximum we theoretically will achieve from proposed future accelerators, like the big loop at the LHC? I'm guessing 1TeV.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 17, 2006 #2

    selfAdjoint

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    The Tevatron collider outside Chicago can get up to 1 TEV in its beam and primary collisions, as its name implies, but not all that energy can be presented in one particle. The maximum particle energy I think they're looking at is around 200 GEV. LHC will be around twice that energetic. The most energetic thing Tevatron has done so far is refine the mass of the top quark, which is now placed at 119 GEV.

    The expected mass of the Higgs is now expected to be somewhere in the range 219 GEV to 250 GEV.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2006
  4. Sep 17, 2006 #3
    Are you sure about your numbers for the LHC? I mean, the maximum beam energy will be 7 TeV (or 7 times larger than the Tevatron). So, why shouldn't the maximum particle mass created scale similarly?
     
  5. Sep 17, 2006 #4

    selfAdjoint

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    Could be, I was just speaking from memory. The point is they will be able to explore the weak scale (200+ GEV) in detail.
     
  6. Sep 17, 2006 #5

    ZapperZ

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    There could also be the subtle detail whether the energy cited is the center of mass energy per parton. Those things are seldom cited clearly in ordinary reports released to the public.

    Zz.
     
  7. Sep 18, 2006 #6
    The Tevatron and the LHC are colliding nucleons together (the LHC is proton-proton while the Tevatron is proton-antiproton). Protons are mainly empty space, with a few quarks and gluons in them, so if you are at high enough energy, the protons will usually pass straight through each other.

    Occasionally, the quarks or gluons from one proton colllide with similar from the other (anti)proton, giving you an interaction. The collider energy is the energy of the protons, not the quarks and gluons. Since this energy is shared out amongst the quarks and gluons, the actual collision energy is considerably less.

    For example, in the LHC, the protons are mainly made up of gluons with a typical energy of about 600GeV. So a typical LHC collision probes about a TeV (although there are obviously tails in the distributions, so you will get some considerably higher).
     
  8. Sep 18, 2006 #7
    And the top quark mass is around 175GeV not 119GeV.

    The Higgs boson mass is most probably around 120GeV or so. Electroweak precision data indicate it is almost definitely less than about 200GeV.
     
  9. Sep 18, 2006 #8


    Can you explain how you get the Top Quark to be 119 GEV? Are you sure you didn't make a mistake? Read this:

    'The Collider Detector Facility group had found 56 top candidates over a predicted background of 23 and the D0 group found 17 events over a predicted background of 3.8. The value for the top quark mass from the combined data of the two groups after the completion of the run was 174.3 +/- 5.1 GeV. This is over 180 times the mass of a proton and about twice the mass of the next heaviest fundamental particle, the Z0 vector boson at about 93 GeV.'http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/hframe.html
     
  10. Sep 18, 2006 #9

    selfAdjoint

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    I deeply apologize. The latest figures from the D0 experiment at Tevatron are mt = 177.7 ± 8.8(stat)+3.7
    −4.5(syst) GeV. (published last July). I don't know where I got that other number! Teach me to post in a hurry.
     
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