What's Wrong with this article on Stonehenge history?

In summary, the article discusses how recent research suggests that the builders of Stonehenge may have used Pythagoras' theorem centuries before his birth. However, there is some debate about the accuracy of this claim and whether the ancient Egyptians and other cultures knew about the theorem before the Greeks. The conversation also touches on how many mathematical formulas and concepts were known to ancient civilizations before they were "discovered" by modern scientists.
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  • #2
Pythagoras lived between 570 BC and 495 BC. His theorem, a part of Euclidean geometry taught in many high school math classes, states that the hypotenuse of a right triangle (the side opposite the right angle) equals the sum of the squares of the other two sides.

I believe this should say the square of the hypotenuse. Beyond that I'm uncertain of what may be incorrect.
 
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  • #3
And the Professor said anyone else?
 
  • #4
5:12:13 was known in ancient Egypt long before Pythagoras, and 3:4:5 was known as well. What Pythagoras found was the general pattern. Examples of rectangular triangles are not the Pythagorean theorem.

12:35:37 is more interesting if it can be shown that this was deliberate.
 
  • #5
mfb said:
5:12:13 was known in ancient Egypt long before Pythagoras, and 3:4:5 was known as well. What Pythagoras found was the general pattern. Examples of rectangular triangles are not the Pythagorean theorem.

12:35:37 is more interesting if it can be shown that this was deliberate.

We regard nearly everything we know to the Greeks (Everything started with the Greeks). In my humble opinion, this is because we have more evidence from the Greeks than any previous culture. Its not like there were no others before them.

Sometimes I get irritated by the fact that we do not know really how much people knew before the Greeks. Maybe they knew Pythagoras theorem but there was no lift evidence for that, who knows, right?!
 
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  • #6
Yes, this is true of Physics as well. There were many formulas known to the ancients that were in common use in engineering that were later derived from Newton's laws. One such formula was the diameter of a torsion catapult rope where the ancients correctly determined that it was proportional the the cube root of the mass to be thrown.

https://books.google.com/books?id=5UohAwAAQBAJ&pg=PA71&lpg=PA71&dq=roman+catapult+cube+root+torsion+formula&source=bl&ots=nxYQnfSzBm&sig=9vUuYQOpfZ76ADFujC7AFA5q6Z8&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjTtKL6q-fbAhUPWa0KHW4JDL0Q6AEITDAI#v=onepage&q=roman catapult cube root torsion formula&f=false

http://www.s608324909.websitehome.co.uk/JohnMcCoy/Catapults%20and%20Cube%20Roots.pdf
 
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  • #7
ppict2.gif

The oldest proof - one word: "See!"
 

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1. What is the main issue with this article on Stonehenge history?

The main issue with this article is that it contains inaccurate and misleading information about the history of Stonehenge.

2. How can I tell if the information in this article is incorrect?

You can tell if the information is incorrect by cross-referencing it with reputable and credible sources on Stonehenge and its history.

3. What sources should I check to verify the accuracy of this article?

Some reliable sources for information on Stonehenge include archaeological studies, academic journals, and reputable museums or historical sites.

4. Why is it important to have accurate information about Stonehenge?

Having accurate information about Stonehenge is important because it is a significant historical and cultural site, and inaccuracies can perpetuate false narratives and misinterpretations of its purpose and significance.

5. Can I trust the information in this article even though it may be incorrect?

No, it is not advisable to trust information that has been proven to be incorrect. It is important to fact-check and verify information before accepting it as true.

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