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When neutrinos blow apart a star.

  1. Jun 11, 2010 #1
    Reading from The Astrophysics Spectator:

    http://www.astrophysicsspectator.com/topics/supernovae/SupernovaeCoreCollapse.html

    "When a stellar core collapses, its high density spurs the creation of thermal neutrinos through a variety of processes. The core itself is not transparent to neutrinos, so they interact and come into thermal equilibrium with the core before escaping. The mass surrounding the core is almost transparent to these neutrinos, so very few neutrinos give up energy to the surrounding mass. The tiny amount of energy lost by the neutrinos to the surrounding mass, however, is more than sufficient to blow this mass away from the core. The most energetic explosions in the universe therefore hide most of their energy from our sight; we see the brilliant light and the high speed of the supernova debris, but we almost never see the neutrinos that carry away almost all of the energy generated in the birth of the neutron star. ...

    In the above,

    "The tiny amount of energy lost by the neutrinos to the surrounding mass, however, is more than sufficient to blow this mass away from the core. ...

    So there is a radial burst of neutrinos from the dying star that blows the "top" off the star. Do the neutrinos "push" as hard on the positively charged matter as the negatively charged matter? If the "force" is different does this then temporally polarize such matter?

    Thanks for any help!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 11, 2010 #2
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