Where are the granules that we see on the Sun? (Photosphere? Convection Zone?)

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Are the granules that we see on the Sun actually in the photosphere? Or are they actually just the top of the convection zone, with the photosphere beginning just above them? Or is the photosphere simply defined as the top edge of the convection zone where the granules are present, having resulted from all of that convection below?
 

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Drakkith
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Per wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photosphere

The Sun's photosphere is around 100 kilometers thick, and is composed of convection cells called granules—cells of plasma each approximately 1000 kilometers in diameter with hot rising plasma in the center and cooler plasma falling in the narrow spaces between them, flowing at velocities of 7 kilometer per second. Each granule has a lifespan of only about twenty minutes, resulting in a continually shifting "boiling" pattern.
 
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Thanks! That makes perfect sense.
 

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