1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Which chemical makes a basic sol'n? (MC)

  1. Sep 1, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    2. The attempt at a solution

    The way I understand, they would all dissociate like this:
    NaCl(s) --> Na(+) + Cl(-)

    I'm pretty sure the Cl(-) is a Bronsted base, or anything with a -ve charge, but as for the solution as a whole being basic, I'm not sure what they're asking....

    Basically I'm screwed. Is this something you have to just know already?
    Can anyone help me figure this out or refer me to a helpful resource?
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2009
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 1, 2009 #2

    berkeman

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acids_and_bases

    Does that help?
     
  4. Sep 1, 2009 #3
    Construct chemical equations and react all the chemicals with H2O to see what they produce.

    Just because a chemical is a Bronsted-Lowry base does not necessarily mean it produces a basic solution. For example, NaCl does not produce a basic solution, but Cl- is a Bronsted-Lowry base.
     
  5. Sep 2, 2009 #4

    Borek

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Extremally weak one, we should add.

    --
     
  6. Sep 3, 2009 #5
    So, the question is referring to the products and not the ions that react?
     
  7. Sep 3, 2009 #6

    Borek

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    In a way... basic solution is the one with high pH, so OH- must be an important product. But you have to think about which ions in water will be a source of OH-.

    --
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook