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Which is grammatically better: relationship or relation?

  1. relation

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  2. relationschip

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  1. Jul 28, 2012 #1
    What is grammatically more correct?

    There exists a relation between x and y.
    or
    There exists a relationship between x and y.

    So, "relationship" or "relation"?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 28, 2012 #2

    phinds

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    I think relationship sounds MUCH better, but relation is probably also grammatically correct albeit awkward.
     
  4. Jul 28, 2012 #3

    AlephZero

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    X and y are related.

    Save three words plus a few letters, and bypass the problem :smile:
     
  5. Jul 28, 2012 #4
    Thanks - will use this wherever possible. However, often you cannot bypass the problem as in e.g., "Therefore, relationship (4) can be written as ...", "The previous relationships represent ..." I realize you could possibly use "equation (4)" or "previous equations represent." Still, I would like to know if there is some convention or at least your preference.
     
  6. Jul 28, 2012 #5

    Danger

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    To the best of my knowledge, a "relation" is a component of a "relationship". For example, a sister is a relation (or relative), with whom you have a relationship.
     
  7. Jul 28, 2012 #6

    arildno

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  8. Jul 28, 2012 #7

    Vanadium 50

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    This isn't grammar. It's diction.
     
  9. Jul 28, 2012 #8
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/relation

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/relationship

    It looks to me like they're more synonymous than most synonyms. I think you can use either, but if you get into a situation where you can't decide which is more fluid sounding, use AlephZero's solution.
     
  10. Jul 28, 2012 #9
    You are correct, sir:

     
  11. Jul 28, 2012 #10

    Danger

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    Let me guess... you found that in a grammary somewhere?
     
  12. Jul 28, 2012 #11

    Ygggdrasil

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    It probably fits more under usage than diction.
     
  13. Jul 28, 2012 #12
    My wife says a relationship is between x and y. I'm y, she's x.
     
  14. Jul 28, 2012 #13

    arildno

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    You are only ASSUMING you are her "y", jimmy.
     
  15. Jul 28, 2012 #14
    :rofl:
     
  16. Jul 29, 2012 #15
    If you know both are correct, then which you choose is a matter of diction. Given the way the OP asked, though, it was probably more of a usage question, because he wondered if one or the other were more "correct" in a math setting.
     
  17. Jul 29, 2012 #16
    No. The sentence, "You are correct, sir!" comes from Ed McMahon on the old Johnny Carson Show.
     
  18. Jul 29, 2012 #17

    jtbell

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    No, you're xy, she's xx.
     
  19. Jul 29, 2012 #18

    Danger

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    Oh, contraire, Moosebreath. :tongue:

    I didn't realize that your link wouldn't show up in the quote. That sort of ruined the joke.
    By the bye, I just shelled out $50 (plus GST) for the 15-disc collection of Johnny Carson's 40 years on The Tonight Show. It'll be worth the price if it has the bit with Burt Reynolds, Dom DeLouise, the eggs, the leather pants, and the whipped cream. I saw it live, and it still ranks as one of the funniest things in the history of improv comedy.
    I do have self-discipline, though, so I'm not going to open the package until I've watched all 6 seasons of Lost. I haven't seen beyond season 4 yet, and that was long enough ago that I have to start over. (Spoilers are not welcome.)
     
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