Which is grammatically better: relationship or relation?

  • Thread starter remicengels
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Which is better to use in a science text?

  • relation

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • relationschip

    Votes: 2 100.0%

  • Total voters
    2
  • #1
remicengels
What is grammatically more correct?

There exists a relation between x and y.
or
There exists a relationship between x and y.

So, "relationship" or "relation"?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
phinds
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I think relationship sounds MUCH better, but relation is probably also grammatically correct albeit awkward.
 
  • #3
AlephZero
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X and y are related.

Save three words plus a few letters, and bypass the problem :smile:
 
  • #4
remicengels
Thanks - will use this wherever possible. However, often you cannot bypass the problem as in e.g., "Therefore, relationship (4) can be written as ...", "The previous relationships represent ..." I realize you could possibly use "equation (4)" or "previous equations represent." Still, I would like to know if there is some convention or at least your preference.
 
  • #5
Danger
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To the best of my knowledge, a "relation" is a component of a "relationship". For example, a sister is a relation (or relative), with whom you have a relationship.
 
  • #7
Vanadium 50
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This isn't grammar. It's diction.
 
  • #8
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re·la·tion   [ri-ley-shuhn]
noun
1.
an existing connection; a significant association between or among things: the relation between cause and effect.
2.
relations,
a.
the various connections between peoples, countries, etc.: foreign relations.
b.
the various connections in which persons are brought together: business and social relations.
c.
sexual intercourse.
3.
the mode or kind of connection between one person and another, between an individual and God, etc.
4.
connection between persons by blood or marriage.
5.
a person who is related by blood or marriage; relative: his wife's relations.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/relation

re·la·tion·ship   [ri-ley-shuhn-ship]
noun
1.
a connection, association, or involvement.
2.
connection between persons by blood or marriage.
3.
an emotional or other connection between people: the relationship between teachers and students.
4.
a sexual involvement; affair.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/relationship

It looks to me like they're more synonymous than most synonyms. I think you can use either, but if you get into a situation where you can't decide which is more fluid sounding, use AlephZero's solution.
 
  • #9
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This isn't grammar. It's diction.
You are correct, sir:

dic·tion   [dik-shuhn]
noun
1.
style of speaking or writing as dependent upon choice of words: good diction.
2.
the accent, inflection, intonation, and speech-sound quality manifested by an individual speaker, usually judged in terms of prevailing standards of acceptability; enunciation.
 
  • #10
Danger
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You are correct, sir:
Let me guess... you found that in a grammary somewhere?
 
  • #12
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My wife says a relationship is between x and y. I'm y, she's x.
 
  • #13
arildno
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My wife says a relationship is between x and y. I'm y, she's x.
You are only ASSUMING you are her "y", jimmy.
 
  • #14
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You are only ASSUMING you are her "y", jimmy.
:rofl:
 
  • #15
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It probably fits more under usage than diction.
If you know both are correct, then which you choose is a matter of diction. Given the way the OP asked, though, it was probably more of a usage question, because he wondered if one or the other were more "correct" in a math setting.
 
  • #16
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Let me guess... you found that in a grammary somewhere?
No. The sentence, "You are correct, sir!" comes from Ed McMahon on the old Johnny Carson Show.
 
  • #18
Danger
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No. The sentence, "You are correct, sir!" comes from Ed McMahon on the old Johnny Carson Show.
Oh, contraire, Moosebreath. :tongue:

I didn't realize that your link wouldn't show up in the quote. That sort of ruined the joke.
By the bye, I just shelled out $50 (plus GST) for the 15-disc collection of Johnny Carson's 40 years on The Tonight Show. It'll be worth the price if it has the bit with Burt Reynolds, Dom DeLouise, the eggs, the leather pants, and the whipped cream. I saw it live, and it still ranks as one of the funniest things in the history of improv comedy.
I do have self-discipline, though, so I'm not going to open the package until I've watched all 6 seasons of Lost. I haven't seen beyond season 4 yet, and that was long enough ago that I have to start over. (Spoilers are not welcome.)
 

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