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Why do some still type Gauß for Gauss?

  1. Jul 30, 2013 #1
    I know that "ß" represents "ss", being a long s attached to a modern s, but why do some people STILL type it this way? Is it any different to writing Чебышёв for Chebychev?
     
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  3. Jul 30, 2013 #2

    jtbell

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    The spelling with ß is still the correct one in modern German, as far as I know. We have some people from German-speaking countries here, so it may simply be force of habit for them.
     
  4. Jul 30, 2013 #3

    SteamKing

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    This article (or Artikel) on German Orthographic Reform is quite amusing.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_orthography_reform_of_1996

    A body of concerned German speakers attempting to fix a problem which didn't exist and wound up causing quite an upset throughout the German-speaking community. Some folks (or Volk) are constitutionally unable to leave 'well enough' alone.
     
  5. Jul 30, 2013 #4
    They are just doing it to look cool.
     
  6. Jul 30, 2013 #5

    AlephZero

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    Two words:

    Noah Webster :smile:

    (But being an American, he didn't waste time setting up an international committee!)
     
  7. Jul 30, 2013 #6

    SteamKing

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    I think the example of Noah Webster is not quite germane to the German Orthographic Reforms of 1996. While Webster's notions about English grammar and orthography diverged somewhat from how these subjects were practiced in the British Isles, at the time of Webster, things like dictionaries were relatively new on the scene, and there was no central authority on these subjects, like the French have attempted with the Academie Francaise in matters dealing with their language. It is important to note that not all of Webster's ideas on these subjects were adopted, especially with regard to spelling reform. With the English speaking population of the New World somewhat cut off from the home country, it would not be unreasonable to expect some divergence over time in how the language was written and spoken.

    In the situation with German, that language had a pretty concise and faithful orthography up to the point where these reforms were proposed. While many quibble that English suffers from a horrible set of orthographic rules, where the same sounds can be represented in several and inconsistent ways, IMO, the French language suffers from a similar defect, and could withstand a bit of reform. All-in-all, I think the German reform stirred up controversy where none had existed before.
     
  8. Aug 1, 2013 #7

    Cthugha

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    It is still the correct form. The "ß" was changed to "ss" after short vowels only. It is still "ß" after long vowels. Also, names were not changed in general.

    Today, Gauß would hate to visit the US, by the way. I have that "ß" in my last name, too, and it is always the same fun discussion at the security about how my name looks funny, whether I am sure that this is not a capital "B" in the middle of my name, about why my name is spelled differently in my passport on the one hand and the machine-readable part of my passport and the boarding pass on the other hand and so on....
     
  9. Aug 2, 2013 #8

    Curious3141

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    If you have "funny" characters in your name, you're automatically considered a terrorist by the US DHS/TSA. :biggrin:
     
  10. Aug 2, 2013 #9
    That's just a transliteration. That's like saying in Russian "can we say Фейнман?". Well, you CAN, but it's just a transliteration.
     
  11. Aug 2, 2013 #10

    Cthugha

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    It is even worse. If you replace the "ß" by the standard "ss" in my name (as is used in some part of the passport), almost 50% of my name becomes a well known swearword (yes: exactly what you are thinking of right now and yes: I probably already heard every possible joke about that). One time someone really suspected I forged my id and thought I wanted to fool him. :biggrin:
     
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