Why hasnt been artificial satellites torn apart?

  • Thread starter Astro.padma
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In summary, the artificial satellites of Earth orbit within the Roche limit due to their tensile strength.
  • #1
Astro.padma
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Do you think that the artificial satellites of Earth revolve inside the Roche limit? If
inside, why are they not breaking apart? Are there any specific reasons?


Sorry if am asking sill doubts but pls answer me as am really a Beginner :)
 
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  • #2
Google and wikipedia are your friends. The answer is in the wikipedia article on the Roche limit.
 
  • #3
Aww, was going to reply. Let's see if pranathi can figure it out from the wiki article though.
 
  • #4
Interesting - is tensile strength also the main reason why objects don't explode in vacuums?
 
  • #5
Simfish said:
Interesting - is tensile strength also the main reason why objects don't explode in vacuums?

Only if there is gas inside the object. Otherwise it won't want to explode, as there is no force putting pressure on the inside. It doesn't take that much strength to keep about 1 atmosphere pressurized in space. A common household air compressor would be overkill if that's all you wanted to do. What's more important is that the object has the strength to survive launch and manuevering.
 
  • #6
Nabeshin said:
Aww, was going to reply. Let's see if pranathi can figure it out from the wiki article though.

Some real satellites, both natural and artificial, can orbit within their Roche limits because they are held together by forces other than gravitation. Jupiter's moon Metis and Saturn's moon Pan are examples of such satellites, which hold together because of their tensile strength.

:shy: This is what I could get from wiki...So is the tensile strength alone, reason for this or are there any other factors? Can you please give me in brief , sir :)
 
  • #7
pranathi said:
Some real satellites, both natural and artificial, can orbit within their Roche limits because they are held together by forces other than gravitation. Jupiter's moon Metis and Saturn's moon Pan are examples of such satellites, which hold together because of their tensile strength.

:shy: This is what I could get from wiki...So is the tensile strength alone, reason for this or are there any other factors? Can you please give me in brief , sir :)
Tensile strength is all that is needed to explain why satellites can orbit within their Roche limits. The Roche limit describes the point at which a rubble pile will be torn apart. All that holds a rubble pile together is gravitation itself, and gravity is a very weak force.

Imagine astronauts taking trips to a rubble pile versus a rocky asteroid of more or less the same mass and density. Escape velocity from an asteroid is very, very low. The astronauts will have to take care not to jump to hard lest they jump right off. An astronaut on a rubble pile could pick up one of the little rocks that form the rubble pile and give it a toss that puts it on an escape trajectory. Astronauts could do the same on a rocky asteroid, but first they would have to chip off a piece of the asteroid. Rocky asteroids are bound together chemically as well as gravitationally.

Put that rubble pile in orbit about a planet within the Roche limit and gravity gradient from the planet's gravity field will tear the rubble pile apart. It would take a lot more effort to tear apart a rocky asteroid, and even more to tear apart a metallic artificial satellite.
 
  • #8
Umm... thank you Sir :)
 

1. Why do artificial satellites not get torn apart in orbit?

Artificial satellites are designed and engineered to withstand the harsh conditions of space. They are made with durable materials and are built to withstand extreme temperatures, radiation, and debris. Additionally, they are placed in orbits that minimize the risk of collisions with other objects in space.

2. How do artificial satellites stay in orbit without getting torn apart?

Artificial satellites have a specific velocity and trajectory that enables them to maintain a stable orbit around the Earth. This is achieved through precise calculations and adjustments made by ground control stations. The satellites also have thrusters and gyroscopes to help maintain their position and orientation.

3. Can artificial satellites be destroyed by natural forces in space?

While artificial satellites are designed to withstand harsh conditions in space, they are not completely impervious to natural forces. They can be damaged or destroyed by intense solar flares, solar winds, and micrometeoroids. However, the likelihood of this happening is relatively low and satellites can be replaced if necessary.

4. What prevents artificial satellites from colliding with each other and getting torn apart?

To prevent collisions, artificial satellites are placed in carefully calculated orbits with specific altitudes and inclinations. Additionally, they are constantly monitored by ground control stations and can make minor adjustments to their orbits if necessary. Satellites also have tracking and communication systems to avoid collisions with other objects in space.

5. Will artificial satellites eventually get torn apart due to the Earth's gravity?

The Earth's gravity does have an effect on artificial satellites, but it is not strong enough to tear them apart. Satellites are placed in orbits where the gravitational pull of the Earth is balanced by their own velocity, allowing them to maintain a stable orbit. Over time, satellites may experience orbital decay, but this can be controlled through regular adjustments and maneuvers.

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