Words a foreigner should know in US

  • Thread starter Clausius2
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  • #26
Integral
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Lisa! said:
Good Luck. By the way, when's your goodbye party?
Hopefully he will not need, or get, a PF goodbye party. He should spend a couple of days traveling then be in San Diego with internet acess and will be joining us from his new time zone, so the time he posts may change but he aint going nowhere as far as we are concerned. :biggrin:


My bet is that within 6 months he will be speaking american slang with the best of them.
 
  • #27
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Clausius2 said:
Game - is this used as: He has a great game (He has flirted with too many women)?
If a guy has great game he is good at flirting with women, or good at "hooking up". I don't think flirting with too many women is possible. :tongue2:
 
  • #28
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Yeah, game is more of a skill: He is good (sucessful) at picking up women, as rocketboy said.

Lets do a combo exercise :smile:
-What does this mean: Damn dogg that guy is a playa, he has some mad game!

(In the same context of picking up women.)
 
  • #29
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If some one askes you if "your down with it" they mean do you understand and accept what they are telling/doing.
 
  • #30
LYN, I've never heard any one around here use the terms "Bird" or "Pigeon".
And I thought that people working while union workers were on strike were called scabs?

Lets see... Some of these might be the same over there, I have no idea.
Maricon: derogatory mexican slang for a homosexual
Joto: same as above.
Puto/Puta: mexican insult which I believe is something akin to the word coward or wuss and akin to the terms above. Puto for males, Puta for females but I think you could probably figure that much out.
Mota: mexican slang for marijuana.
Esse: mexican slang equivilant of "dude" in referance to a male. "Hey esse, what's up?" From what I understand this is mainly used here by Mexican-Americans and not so much in Mexico if at all.
Pinche: mexican slang equivilent of the word "f***ing" but only as an enhancer such as "Pinche gringos" "Pinche puto". It has nothing to do with sex.
Gringo: mexican slang for a white person, just incase you didn't already know.

I might be able to come up with some more later.
 
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  • #31
loseyourname
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TheStatutoryApe said:
LYN, I've never heard any one around here use the terms "Bird" or "Pigeon".
The terminology isn't as common in the OC. It's more of an urban thing, although, to be honest. it really isn't that common in my experience in Los Angeles (don't know about San Diego). I've heard it mostly in songs.

And I thought that people working while union workers were on strike were called scabs?
You're right. I got the two mixed up.
 
  • #32
loseyourname
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juvenal said:
I'd like to also add that I haven't heard quite a few of loseyourname's words or phrases, either ever or in a long, long time.
Where do you live? Maybe the regional slang of southern California isn't as broadly known as I thought. I just figured people would at least here it since it is common in popular music and film.

And some of those terms like wetback, gook, or cool person are very derogatory and close to the equivalent of "cool person" for black people, and should almost never be used unless one is looking for either social banishment or a physical beating.
You'd be surprised at how commonly they are used, especially among younger people. Most won't call a Vietnamese guy a gook to his face, but they'll use that term and others like it in the third person quite frequently.
 
  • #33
loseyourname
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Clausius2 said:
Game - is this used as: He has a great game (He has flirted with too many women)?
It's not that he flirts with too many. In fact, popular concensus seems to be that you can never get too much. "Game" is used to refer to the ability to successfully pick up women. A guy with "game" is a guy that knows how to woo the opposite sex.

Note: There is no use of the indefinite article with this phrase. People won't say "He has a great game," but rather "he has great game."

Off the heezy - Also means off the hook. I don't understand the meaning of off the hook. I didn't caught it.
Off the hook basically means that something really impresses you. For instance, if a guy says that a party was "off the hook," it means that it was a really good party. Personally, I would say that the party was "hoppin'," but that isn't common. In fact, I don't know if anyone else says that.
 
  • #34
Curious3141
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In the aftermath of the British shooting of the innocent Brazilian man, I'd say the word "Freeze !!!" goes to the top of the list. :(
 
  • #35
ek
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Iced Tea in the US isn't sweetened.

I learned that lesson the hard way.

And US Corn Pops are gross. Again, they are pretty much unsweetened.

And you have to figure out just what the hell they call the "place where you urinate/crap".

Here we call it a bathroom. Also called a washroom. Also rarely called a lavatory.

I remember at the Dallas/Ft Worth Airport I asked some woman at the ticket booth where the bathroom was. She says "WHAT?! What are you sayin?" "Can you please tell me where the nearest bathroom is?" "WHAT?! OHHHHHH...You mean RESTROOM...it's right over there". Major WTF moment. I was 13 and had absolutely no clue what a restroom was. But it was indeed a bathroom and I learned a new word that day.

Also, just as a general tip, always count your change! Since all the money is the same colour, cashiers sometimes try and screw you over. You can't get away with it in countries where they have real money, but in the US it is rampant. ESPECIALLY if you look like a tourist or a person who isn't American.

I realize this post is not really what you were looking for, <words> but still, these are things to keep in mind.

:smile:
 
  • #36
Lisa!
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Integral said:
Hopefully he will not need, or get, a PF goodbye party. He should spend a couple of days traveling then be in San Diego with internet acess and will be joining us from his new time zone, so the time he posts may change but he aint going nowhere as far as we are concerned. :biggrin:


My bet is that within 6 months he will be speaking american slang with the best of them.
I think we should say goodbye to Spanish version of Clausius2 and say hello to American version of him. So we still need to hold a PF goodbye party for him, am I right? :wink:
 
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  • #37
ek said:
Iced Tea in the US isn't sweetened.

I learned that lesson the hard way.

And US Corn Pops are gross. Again, they are pretty much unsweetened.

And you have to figure out just what the hell they call the "place where you urinate/crap".

Here we call it a bathroom. Also called a washroom. Also rarely called a lavatory.

I remember at the Dallas/Ft Worth Airport I asked some woman at the ticket booth where the bathroom was. She says "WHAT?! What are you sayin?" "Can you please tell me where the nearest bathroom is?" "WHAT?! OHHHHHH...You mean RESTROOM...it's right over there". Major WTF moment. I was 13 and had absolutely no clue what a restroom was. But it was indeed a bathroom and I learned a new word that day.

Also, just as a general tip, always count your change! Since all the money is the same colour, cashiers sometimes try and screw you over. You can't get away with it in countries where they have real money, but in the US it is rampant. ESPECIALLY if you look like a tourist or a person who isn't American.

I realize this post is not really what you were looking for, <words> but still, these are things to keep in mind.

:smile:
I think that was maybe a Texas thing regarding the restroom. I usually say restroom and that is what they are usually marked but we all know what a bathroom is and wouldn't have any trouble figuring out what your saying. Quite a few people around here say bathroom. Maybe that lady was just being anal retentive about whether or not it should be refered to as a bathroom since there is no bath in it. When I worked at a coffee house I was that way when people tried ordering in Starbucks lingo. That though was mainly because half the time they didn't even know what they were saying.

That's something Clausius. When you order coffee just use simple words. I'm not sure if they have the same barista etiquette in Spain as they do in other countries or not. Around here coffee houses try to use european lingo for their menu but they almost always mess it up.
Starbucks coffee is terrible by the way. Unless you like double roasted beans. Tastes like it was burnt.

And I'm not sure what ek is talking about in regards to money. You should definitely check you change to make sure you got the right amount. People wont usually try to short change you though. Some times they just make mistakes because they've been sitting there at the register giving people change all day long. Sometimes also they're just not very bright. :wink:
I've actually though more often had people give me back more money than they were supposed to. I once had someone accidentally give me back more money than I gave them in the first place.
 
  • #38
Pengwuino
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arildno said:
You need a bit of correction here:
"Queen" is used to designate an effeminate (gay) male; butch occasionally used for a masculine (gay) male.

However, you (as a straight person, that is) can by no means figure out who's the "top" and who's the "bottom" by this.
... Im pretty sure if someones "butch", it means they are a lesbian who looks like a guy. A queen is a royal figure in a monarchy. :tongue2:
 
  • #39
Pengwuino said:
... Im pretty sure if someones "butch", it means they are a lesbian who looks like a guy. A queen is a royal figure in a monarchy. :tongue2:
Butch is used to describe men too. I remember an old roommate of mine saying "ready to get all butched out" when he was refering to moving some heavy boxes.
 
  • #40
Pengwuino
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TheStatutoryApe said:
Butch is used to describe men too. I remember an old roommate of mine saying "ready to get all butched out" when he was refering to moving some heavy boxes.
Then what he meant was that he was getting prepared to call moving men so he can drool over them because he was gay.
 
  • #41
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I thought 'butch' was used to describe a girl who seems manly. Usually associated with girls people think are ugly cuz they're...well, manly.
 
  • #42
arildno
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Pengwuino said:
... Im pretty sure if someones "butch", it means they are a lesbian who looks like a guy.
Quite so; that's why I used the caveat "occasionally".
 
  • #43
Clausius2
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Thanks everyone for posting and helping me here!!!. Surely I will have to look at this despites I will be in USA then. I've learned about the game, about the coffee, about asking for the restroom, and about getting the correct money change, also about butches (in which arildno seems very interested :biggrin: ).

To sum up, thank you very much. If you've got more suggestions, let me know. But now I am going to leave this thread and this forum for some time. I am a bit busy with the arrangements. I hope to see you soon.
 
  • #44
arildno
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Clausius2 said:
also about butches (in which arildno seems very interested :biggrin: ).
"Butch Cassidy&The Sundance Kid"; yep, that's the kind of Western I like.. :approve:
 
  • #45
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loseyourname said:
Where do you live? Maybe the regional slang of southern California isn't as broadly known as I thought. I just figured people would at least here it since it is common in popular music and film.
I live in Pasadena since I attend Caltech, but I've met and hung out with people outside of Caltech. For example, I used to take boxing classes for a while in downtown LA in a gym where it was largely hispanic and black Angelenos.

loseyourname said:
You'd be surprised at how commonly they are used, especially among younger people. Most won't call a Vietnamese guy a gook to his face, but they'll use that term and others like it in the third person quite frequently.
Not in my personal experience, but anyhow, the point was just to warn him not to use it as a term of endearment with any Asians he meets. But perhaps to back up your point, in my high school in NJ, racial epithets like gook seemed to be thrown around more though, but not on a regular frequency. This was also around when all those Vietnam movies were coming out like Platoon and Full Metal Jacket and Hamburger Hill.
 

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