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The Should I Become a Mathematician? Thread

by mathwonk
Tags: mathematician
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JasonRox
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Aug4-07, 12:49 AM
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Quote Quote by marlon View Post
Great choice on the financial field but why care about doin' research in your spare time. Use it to grow in the financial areas. There is a lot to learn there is well. In your case, don't waste your time doing some obscure research that will get you noweher. Most "fulltime" PhD's out there are not even able to produce something useful so why bother ?

Really, stick to the financial maths and your life will be much nicer !

marlon
I really enjoyed the Topology and Algebra that I have learned. So, that's why I will do it on my spare time.

If it does consume too much time, I'll just audit courses and do my own thing. I never plan on stopping. I just want to live in poverty doing it. It's not worth it.
Kummer
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Aug4-07, 09:49 AM
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All that for one course?
I have Summer break now, no University. I self-study for fun all those hours.
JasonRox
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Aug4-07, 10:05 AM
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Quote Quote by Kummer View Post
I have Summer break now, no University. I self-study for fun all those hours.
I guess no offsprings for you.
MathematicalPhysicist
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Aug4-07, 10:07 AM
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fanatic, kummer aren't you?
I mean i also in my vacation would learn on my own some stuff, but still i would go sometimes outside my house, especially when in the semester I don't have time to do so.
MathematicalPhysicist
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Aug4-07, 10:18 AM
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Quote Quote by JasonRox View Post
I guess no offsprings for you.
he can always go the near sperm bank... (-:
but he first needs to go outside the house.
Kummer
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Aug4-07, 01:42 PM
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Quote Quote by loop quantum gravity View Post
fanatic, kummer aren't you?
Yes, I am. But that is because there are certains areas of math I wish to know which are not taught in the University and there is also a lot of stuff which I want to know. If I do something else with my time then I will not know what I want.
mathwonk
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Aug4-07, 02:04 PM
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remember to get some exercise, good food, and sunlight kummer, if only because you can do more math if you stay physically healthy.
MathematicalPhysicist
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Aug5-07, 06:56 AM
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Im not sure sunlight in the summer is a good idea.
preferablly you should go in the morning or the evening.
JasonRox
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Aug5-07, 08:53 AM
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Quote Quote by loop quantum gravity View Post
Im not sure sunlight in the summer is a good idea.
preferablly you should go in the morning or the evening.
Well, he needs to get some Vitamin D that's for sure.

I personally think you need to live a little (like get out of the house). I noticed, on here and elsewhere, people think that hardcore mathematicians have no active social life and all they do is work all day. I would say that's not true at all although there are exceptions like Gauss and Riemann. But look at Galois, Hardy, Littlewood, Halmos, Erdos, Galileo and so on. So where these ideas come from, I don't know but I do know they're far from accurate.
radou
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Aug5-07, 12:09 PM
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Quote Quote by JasonRox View Post
people think that hardcore mathematicians have no active social life and all they do is work all day. I would say that's not true at all although there are exceptions like Gauss and Riemann.
That's true, and it's what people thing about other scientists too, not just mathematicians.

In general, I don't interact with people who believe in stereotypes.
mathwonk
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Aug5-07, 06:02 PM
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the problem is that mathematicians are considered so sexy, they have to be careful when they go out, so as not to be mobbed by women and paparrazzi.
pivoxa15
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Aug6-07, 12:26 AM
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Quote Quote by JasonRox View Post
Well, he needs to get some Vitamin D that's for sure.

I personally think you need to live a little (like get out of the house). I noticed, on here and elsewhere, people think that hardcore mathematicians have no active social life and all they do is work all day. I would say that's not true at all although there are exceptions like Gauss and Riemann. But look at Galois, Hardy, Littlewood, Halmos, Erdos, Galileo and so on. So where these ideas come from, I don't know but I do know they're far from accurate.
There could be genuine reasons why past great mathematicians interact and socialise so much less then today's mathematicians. In the past traveling would have been expensive and time consuming and education was poor so not many people had the expertise so meeting other mathematicians were harder and not that beneficial. Knowledge didn't spread that quickly as not many were doing it so one can afford to work alone. Moreoever Copy right was a servere issue back then. So it would have been more beneficial for the best to be alone. Hence no need to develop one's social skills in order to succeed at maths.

Today things are much different as fields are more specialised so collaboration is more important and is cheaper to do due to cheap communication costs. However there are still a handful of elites who can and choose to do it alone like Perelman. For the rest its more beneficial to collaborate so more social interactions for mathematicians today.
Werg22
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Aug6-07, 03:10 AM
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Well, my take is that the percentage of introverts in the mathematical community far exceeds that of the normal population since introverts tend to spend more time thinking than extroverts and thus have greater affinity for heavily abstract subject such as mathematics.
JasonRox
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Aug6-07, 09:01 AM
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Quote Quote by Werg22 View Post
Well, my take is that the percentage of introverts in the mathematical community far exceeds that of the normal population since introverts tend to spend more time thinking than extroverts and thus have greater affinity for heavily abstract subject such as mathematics.
The most intelligent student in our math departments are introverted/extroverted or extroverted. Probably one the best things about the department. I would hate to hang out with an introvert.
JasonRox
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Quote Quote by pivoxa15 View Post
There could be genuine reasons why past great mathematicians interact and socialise so much less then today's mathematicians. In the past traveling would have been expensive and time consuming and education was poor so not many people had the expertise so meeting other mathematicians were harder and not that beneficial. Knowledge didn't spread that quickly as not many were doing it so one can afford to work alone. Moreoever Copy right was a servere issue back then. So it would have been more beneficial for the best to be alone. Hence no need to develop one's social skills in order to succeed at maths.

Today things are much different as fields are more specialised so collaboration is more important and is cheaper to do due to cheap communication costs. However there are still a handful of elites who can and choose to do it alone like Perelman. For the rest its more beneficial to collaborate so more social interactions for mathematicians today.
I have no idea what you're talking about because I mentionned mathematicians of the past and today.

Perelman is not choosing to be alone. I believe he's anti-social, so that's not a choice at that point. It's a disorder.
Darkiekurdo
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Aug6-07, 09:05 AM
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Do you guys have those moments where you are so demotivated you want to quit with mathematics?
JasonRox
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Aug6-07, 09:07 AM
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Quote Quote by Darkiekurdo View Post
Do you guys have those moments where you are so demotivated you want to quit with mathematics?
Are you crazy?! No way!
Darkiekurdo
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Aug6-07, 09:09 AM
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Never? So if you study mathematics you understand everything immediately?


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