Paper Tower


by bibliophile
Tags: paper, tower
bibliophile
bibliophile is offline
#1
Jan26-08, 12:28 PM
P: 7
I have to build a tower in class that supports at least three textbooks.

Materials
2 pieces of regular printer paper
12 inches of masking tape

Specifics
Must be at least 4" tall
Cannot crumple

I've been working all day trying to figure it out...any help would be welcomed
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bibliophile
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#2
Jan26-08, 12:32 PM
P: 7
Anyone?
_Mayday_
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#3
Jan26-08, 12:43 PM
P: 816
Give an approximate weight for these text books.

bibliophile
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#4
Jan26-08, 01:02 PM
P: 7

Paper Tower


about 1.5 pounds...we have to have at least three, but our main goal is to have over 27
bibliophile
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#5
Jan26-08, 01:04 PM
P: 7
any suggestions
_Mayday_
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#6
Jan26-08, 01:07 PM
P: 816
Are you allowed multiple folds?
_Mayday_
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#7
Jan26-08, 01:12 PM
P: 816
Ok I've just worked it out. Cut each A4 sheet of paper into 4 pieces. Then turn them into cylinders keeping them together with the tape. Then simply space these 8 cyinders out with gaps in the middle, and the books should hold. If you dont understand that just say and ill try explain better.
bibliophile
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#8
Jan26-08, 01:28 PM
P: 7
yes...just forgot something...they all have to be connected
_Mayday_
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#9
Jan26-08, 01:42 PM
P: 816
Ok then connect them.
lightarrow
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#10
Jan26-08, 02:23 PM
P: 1,504
Another possibility is to fold the cylinders at "zig-zag"; this make them more resistant to compression (but reduces their radius). I sometimes play with bank notes this way to sustain glassess.
_Mayday_
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#11
Jan26-08, 02:55 PM
P: 816
Ok, so I would go for a cylinder shape, wether zig zagged or not, I think this is the way to go. Good luck.
bibliophile
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#12
Jan27-08, 04:58 PM
P: 7
lightarrow, can you show me an example?
lightarrow
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#13
Jan27-08, 05:19 PM
P: 1,504
Quote Quote by bibliophile View Post
lightarrow, can you show me an example?
With a bank note: fold the short side of it about 8 mm, then fold the successive 8 mm in the opposite way ecc. At the end you have a kind of "folding door". Then you connect the two short ends of the bank note and you have a kind of "toothed cylinder" one base of which is put horizontallly on a table; then you slowly put an object (a glass for example) trying to find its correct horizontal position on the folded bank note with slight corrections (or it will fall down). It requires some practice. I usually use a 10 € bank note.
plutoisacomet
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#14
Jan27-08, 05:24 PM
P: 91
What class is this for?
plutoisacomet
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#15
Jan27-08, 05:28 PM
P: 91
I had a similar project in a class called "intro to engineering" It was team based and we had to build a load bearing structure out of balsa wood. However, we had to do our brainstorming and final concept design in class to prevent outside help.
lightarrow
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#16
Jan28-08, 10:55 AM
P: 1,504
Quote Quote by bibliophile View Post
lightarrow, can you show me an example?
In addition to what I wrote, I think that "toothed cylinder" construction should be stabilized putting it between two normal cylinders of paper, so that it cannot "open" or "close" when you put the books on it.
>Good work.
Let me know if you succeeded and how.


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