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How to study 12+ hours per day without hurting your...

by mathboy
Tags: hours, hurting, study
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flyingpig
#163
Apr5-10, 03:33 PM
P: 2,568
This is actually an interesting question
anthonych414
#164
Apr7-10, 03:48 PM
P: 85
That's cool I wish I could study for that long, the most I;ve studied for one day is like 3 hours, I'm trying to study more physics and math, but I have official Brevet exams and I'm scared I'll get confused in my exam, I have a lot of physics and math textbooks that are above my level and I'm going to start studying in them in the summer.

@BioCore: you said you are in the life science program are you lebanese?
tej125
#165
Aug3-10, 06:47 AM
P: 1
oh my god!! i am your biggest fan mathboy!!! how do you study for 12+ hours and actually love it, i mean how do you love it. whats your mind set. i have tried to convince myself in the smartest ways, but they were not successful enough! the attractions(TV, games, etc..) keep pulling me. and sometimes i just get really tired. how do you control yourself from those attractions. and how do love studying so much!! i need your help please.
johnnyies
#166
Aug3-10, 10:30 AM
P: 92
I have chalkboards and whiteboards. I stand up when I study.
Leptos
#167
Aug3-10, 01:16 PM
P: 172
I found the best way to study is 1-2 hours in the morning when I wake up, 1-2 hours when I get home, and 1-2 hours before bed.
abelgalois
#168
Aug3-10, 01:52 PM
P: 26
Personally I admire mathboy's ability to study 12+hours a day, especially since he does it out of pure enjoyment. The only time I devoted that much time a day to something was when I was really into MMORPGS as a teenager. I hope I can find that sort of dedication and passion as well.

That said, you probably should devote a slice of your time to friends and other activities and or trying new things out. Having something else that you love doing, preferably with other people is a good way of preventing burn out.
gretun
#169
Aug3-10, 03:05 PM
P: 146
Quote Quote by leptos View Post
i found the best way to study is 1-2 hours in the morning when i wake up, 1-2 hours when i get home, and 1-2 hours before bed.

this
nlsherrill
#170
Aug3-10, 07:21 PM
P: 322
12 hours a day is nuts. I hope your exaggerating...I'd like to see how long you could go before you get burned out, or go insane.

But hey, if that's what you want to do and you find your own selfish pursuits are more important to you than everything else, then your completely entitled to that viewpoint. However, like others have mentioned, networking and collaboration is very important. Success these days surely will not come without both of these.

I personally study for a few hours then take a short break like get a bite to eat and watch a 30 min tv show, then get back at it. I also will study a lot earlier in the day if I know I'm going to go out and drink or w/e with my friends that night. Some will say going out is a waste of time and you gain nothing but I highly disagree. Getting away from the math for a few hours and taking breaks really helps me come back to the table with a fresh mindset. But hey, that's just me.
sava28
#171
Apr11-11, 05:24 AM
P: 1
Hi mathboy!
I'm a student of MIPT, and my best time is 13,5 hours of pure studying. Try to study by standing on your feet or while you walk. There are no limits. Lev Landau could study 15-18 hours...
creepypasta13
#172
May11-11, 05:46 PM
P: 375
Looking back on this thread again and being similar to the OP, I would like to share my thoughts. I started off college being painfully shy and studied close to 12 hours/day. I then realized that I had to work on my social skills.. for practical reasons, like networking, interviewing for jobs, etc. But I had no interest in things normal people like (watching movies, TV, listening to pop music, etc) and had no non-academic hobbies. Thus, socializing was extremely difficult for me. I changed that by getting involved in a sport. I met alot of non-physics majors and made decent friendships with some of them and alot of acquaintances, but towards the end of college. However, being in so many uncomfortable social situations got me really depressed and my grades suffered. It dropped from a 4.0 to about 3.6

So I screwed things up. Ideally, I wished I had spent my early college years socializing and, after building up the bare minimum social skills needed to be 'healthy' and helpful for practical purposes, I should have spent my later years studying close to 12 hours/day. Thats why I'm really jealous at people who do really academically and still have good social skills. They developed them at a younger age and didn't have to waste time in college to work on them. As a result, I got admitted to top-20 physics and math schools, but didn't get to any in the top-10. I don't know if I made the right decisions or not as it really hurt not getting into any top-5 or top-10 schools. I'm not painfully shy anymore and have gotten past interviews to get job offers. But I paid a big price, considering that my social skills are still far from great and my odds for becoming a professor are now dramatically reduced
DrManhattanVB
#173
May11-11, 07:04 PM
P: 21
Quote Quote by creepypasta13 View Post
Looking back on this thread again and being similar to the OP, I would like to share my thoughts. I started off college being painfully shy and studied close to 12 hours/day. I then realized that I had to work on my social skills.. for practical reasons, like networking, interviewing for jobs, etc. But I had no interest in things normal people like (watching movies, TV, listening to pop music, etc) and had no non-academic hobbies. Thus, socializing was extremely difficult for me. I changed that by getting involved in a sport. I met alot of non-physics majors and made decent friendships with some of them and alot of acquaintances, but towards the end of college. However, being in so many uncomfortable social situations got me really depressed and my grades suffered. It dropped from a 4.0 to about 3.6

So I screwed things up. Ideally, I wished I had spent my early college years socializing and, after building up the bare minimum social skills needed to be 'healthy' and helpful for practical purposes, I should have spent my later years studying close to 12 hours/day. Thats why I'm really jealous at people who do really academically and still have good social skills. They developed them at a younger age and didn't have to waste time in college to work on them. As a result, I got admitted to top-20 physics and math schools, but didn't get to any in the top-10. I don't know if I made the right decisions or not as it really hurt not getting into any top-5 or top-10 schools. I'm not painfully shy anymore and have gotten past interviews to get job offers. But I paid a big price, considering that my social skills are still far from great and my odds for becoming a professor are now dramatically reduced

I really hope you dont think you need to be in a top 10 school or top 5 school to become a professor. Yes, its nearly impossible. But theres research groups even at top 50 schools that will put you on track for a top quality post-doc.

Studying 12 hours a day for 5 days a week outside of midterms and finals is absolutely ridiculous. Im skeptical, because ive never needed that much time in order to master the material well enough to get A's, usually 4 to 5 hours per day is enough for me.
creepypasta13
#174
May11-11, 07:50 PM
P: 375
Quote Quote by DrManhattanVB View Post
I really hope you dont think you need to be in a top 10 school or top 5 school to become a professor. Yes, its nearly impossible. But theres research groups even at top 50 schools that will put you on track for a top quality post-doc.

Studying 12 hours a day for 5 days a week outside of midterms and finals is absolutely ridiculous. Im skeptical, because ive never needed that much time in order to master the material well enough to get A's, usually 4 to 5 hours per day is enough for me.
Well the odds are much better at a top 5 or 10 school. At the schools I got admitted to, most of the faculty whose research I'm interested in are young, recently tenured professors, and not really well-known.

The OP and I didnt study 12 hours a day just to get A's. We used that time to learn material outside class or learn more details about the class material in order to greater appreciate what we were learning (as opposed to doing the minimum necessary to get A's).
DrManhattanVB
#175
May11-11, 09:36 PM
P: 21
Quote Quote by creepypasta13 View Post
Well the odds are much better at a top 5 or 10 school. At the schools I got admitted to, most of the faculty whose research I'm interested in are young, recently tenured professors, and not really well-known.

The OP and I didnt study 12 hours a day just to get A's. We used that time to learn material outside class or learn more details about the class material in order to greater appreciate what we were learning (as opposed to doing the minimum necessary to get A's).
Well I guess I envy you in that sense then. Its just I find it very hard to find that kindve time during the week to study, and I can only stay in but so much on the weekend before I begin to get depressed and feel lonely.
MissSilvy
#176
May12-11, 01:32 PM
P: 299
Believe it or not, the quality of studying is actually better than the quantity and I am very skeptical of anyone who says the fifth hour of studying in a ten hour block is as good as the first two. I get up two hours early most days, three on weekends, go to a cafe and drink some coffee while working on my studies. I do a little at night, but not very much (1-2 hours) and I get waaay more done than the chumps having marathon 'study' sessions in the library. After a while, you lose focus, no matter how much you love what you're doing. I'd say wake up early, study for a few hours, then go about your day. If this isn't enough, then think of adding more time slots to your schedule, but don't just glue yourself to a chair for ten hours and think that such a method is the best or only way to get stuff done.
leontd
#177
May13-11, 02:41 AM
P: 16
8 Hours is pretty common in meds school, but 12 hours is a bit over the border there. Considering you take 4hrs of classes in a day and sleep for 8 hrs, your life will just be school + eat + sleep > repeat for x years, assuming you going for a PH.D.
Ryker
#178
May13-11, 12:44 PM
P: 1,088
Quote Quote by MissSilvy View Post
Believe it or not, the quality of studying is actually better than the quantity and I am very skeptical of anyone who says the fifth hour of studying in a ten hour block is as good as the first two. I get up two hours early most days, three on weekends, go to a cafe and drink some coffee while working on my studies. I do a little at night, but not very much (1-2 hours) and I get waaay more done than the chumps having marathon 'study' sessions in the library. After a while, you lose focus, no matter how much you love what you're doing. I'd say wake up early, study for a few hours, then go about your day. If this isn't enough, then think of adding more time slots to your schedule, but don't just glue yourself to a chair for ten hours and think that such a method is the best or only way to get stuff done.
Exactly, I have a friend that has excelled in med school, studying around 6 hours per day prior to exams, and graduating near the top of his class. Even so, he says he could probably optimize his studies and study even less, and I agree with that fully. I put in more work than that since apparently I haven't found that sweet spot yet, but plugging away mindlessly isn't helping. And no one can honestly say they truly enjoy studying 12 hours per day (if they do, I feel pity for them and their one-dimensionality). Sure, you can't just always go by what you feel like doing at that exact moment, but once you're over a certain threshold, you should really focus on doing other things that interest you, as it's going to help with studies, as well. People are "successful" because they're interesting, not because they conform to the working more is better ethic for the sake of it.
James Wine
#179
May13-11, 02:55 PM
P: 8
Get some study partners+whiteboards that hang on the wall. Two problems fixed then.
Geezer
#180
May13-11, 06:55 PM
P: 292
Quote Quote by MissSilvy View Post
Believe it or not, the quality of studying is actually better than the quantity and I am very skeptical of anyone who says the fifth hour of studying in a ten hour block is as good as the first two. I get up two hours early most days, three on weekends, go to a cafe and drink some coffee while working on my studies. I do a little at night, but not very much (1-2 hours) and I get waaay more done than the chumps having marathon 'study' sessions in the library. After a while, you lose focus, no matter how much you love what you're doing. I'd say wake up early, study for a few hours, then go about your day. If this isn't enough, then think of adding more time slots to your schedule, but don't just glue yourself to a chair for ten hours and think that such a method is the best or only way to get stuff done.
I could do that when I was an undergrad, but now I'm married and have a kid; there's so little time I can devote to studying anymore. Now, I'm more interested in studying efficiently rather than studying for long periods of time.


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