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11-Year-Old Graduates From LA [Community] College

  1. Jun 8, 2009 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/11-Year-Old-Graduates-From-LA-College.html?yhp=1

    It was interesting to note how Fox News reported this story.
    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,525254,00.html

    Is there such a thing as an AA in Astrophysics?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 8, 2009 #2
    Good for him, we need more smart people in the world.

    I just visited an old professor today at his farm with his wife. He was telling us a story about when he was an undergrad at MIT. He scored a 41 on the test, and the kid in front of him got a 37. He went up to the teacher and asked why he got a 37. The teacher told him, "You used all this funny notation and so I took off points". The student then told him, that's short hand for tensor notation. The professor then looked at his paper again and said "come with me!". They walked out, and he never saw him again. Weeks later he saw the kid across the street from where he lived and asked him why he wasn't in class anymore. The kid told him the professor moved him to graduate math courses, and that the 'student' was 15 years old. My professor said that's when he realized he was among people he could never be as smart as no matter how hard he tried.

    (This was back in the 60's and he was a physics major. The class was freshman physics)
     
  4. Jun 8, 2009 #3

    Pengwuino

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    Giggle, http://www.elac.edu/academic/ELAC_Catalog0709SM.pdf [Broken]

    They have it as a "discipline" whatever the hell that means, but no degree or certificate. I HAVE heard of degrees in astronomy from city colleges... but i heard it a long time ago... possibly in a world that doesn't exist... or Ukraine.

    I wonder what ever happens to kids like these? Oh I know tensors in 3rd grade, I can solve complex differential equations by 5th grade... where do they tend to end up? I hope they all don't burn out or go insane with their genius. Makes you feel kinda dumb though huh...

    5 bucks says Cyrus is going to copy that last sentence and make it into a joke at my expense.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  5. Jun 8, 2009 #4

    Pyrrhus

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    This is true, while I was an undergrad at alma matter I thought I was SMART!. Now as a Grad student, boy I AM LOSING FAITH! hahaha. So many smart people in Grad School!. It's amazing!. I am glad I am Smart enough to survive and have a 4.0 GPA in Grad School, but damn.. I am glad I am not smart enough to feel pressured about wanting to have an original new idea like John Forbes, or Daniel McFadden, Gordon Newell or others.

    Pengwuino, some do don't live up to their expectation or potential. Have you ever heard about William James Sidis?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  6. Jun 8, 2009 #5

    Pengwuino

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    :rofl: reading that other thread about us being significant was silly. THIS article makes me feel insignificant...
     
  7. Jun 8, 2009 #6
    My professors wife was telling a story about a kid who grew up with her. While in elementary school this kid decided to invent algebra while everyone else was learning addition. The teacher couldn't believe this kid invented algebra on his own. He moved away and years later she read in a newspaper he had graduated with a PhD in mathematics from UCLA, which was a top school at the time, at age (15?). But his mother was mentally ill and killed herself when the kid was 3. She never heard about this guy again after that article and suspects he might also be mentally ill since it typically runs in the family.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  8. Jun 8, 2009 #7
    I use people to my advantage. If I know someone is good at something, I just go to them and have them show it to me. You get a lot more work done, quicker, and of higher quality, when you use other peoples strengths to your advantage. Otherwise, you pound your head trying to do what you know someone else is already good at. Cut out the middle man (yourself in this case), and go to the source. I do this all the time. If I have a question, I'll call up a contact at Hopkins, or NASA Langley, or another any other source I might have up my sleeve. I never try to do things on my own unless I know I can't get someone to do/explain it for me. I just don't have the time to sit there and try and do everything from scratch on my own, nor do I care to.
     
  9. Jun 8, 2009 #8

    Pyrrhus

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    That's very good advice, Cyrus.

    By the way, check this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erik_Demaine" [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  10. Jun 8, 2009 #9
    Tell that guy to make me some kind of cool ipod/web browser computer -thingy that I can go oooh ahh. CLICK CLICK CLICK CLICK.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  11. Jun 8, 2009 #10
  12. Jun 8, 2009 #11
    Hopefully the kid turns out ok and will publish alot of papers.
     
  13. Jun 8, 2009 #12

    Moonbear

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    The one child prodigy genius type I knew in school (he was only about 4 years ahead) did end up burning out. Since he was so good in math and physics in high school, he of course headed to university for physics. He ended up hating the subject...just because you're good at it doesn't mean it's what you want to do the rest of your life. Once getting over his depression, he ended up switching to a liberal arts major. He seemed happier last I heard from him, but I also haven't heard from him in about 10 years. He never had a normal childhood, and his adult social relations suffered for it. Sometimes you just have to let kids be kids, no matter how smart they are.

    Edit: Though, hee, maybe this is more a commentary on the level of education provided by that particular community college...so easy, even an 11 year old can do it! :biggrin:
     
  14. Jun 8, 2009 #13

    turbo

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    Sign up for our courses. If you have trouble, we'll get an 11-year-old to tutor you.
     
  15. Jun 8, 2009 #14
    I have a lot in common with this young man. When I was 11, I didn't play video games either.
     
  16. Jun 8, 2009 #15
    I think his parents are smart enough not to put him in pressure, at least in public.
     
  17. Jun 8, 2009 #16
    My friend (The one that PMed you about Med School a while back), had 8 year old girl in his biology class who would answer the professors questions when the rest of the lecture hall was dead silent. The professor said, "see, its so easy a child can do it!"
     
  18. Jun 8, 2009 #17
    I hope he can help us unravel some of the mysteries of the universe. I'm sure I'll be reading his papers shortly.
     
  19. Jun 8, 2009 #18
    I feel so dumb. :(
     
  20. Jun 8, 2009 #19
    That's because you are. :smile:
     
  21. Jun 8, 2009 #20
    How can one maintain this feeling (feeling inferior, challenged, puzzled, astonished)? If I could maintain this for a good while, I think it might motivate me to tackle difficult subjects (of course difficult on my scale would be a walk in the park for those geniuses).
     
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