A model behind the Standard Model?

In summary, the papers discuss the possibility of scalar fields as vielbeins in internal symmetry space and how this can explain the Higgs structure of the standard electroweak theory. They also explore the idea of generations as "dual" to color and how this can lead to a successful model with baryon-lepton number conservation and a 3-valued generation index for leptons and quarks. Their model has implications that still need to be tested, but it offers a potential theoretical basis for some of the assumptions made in the Standard Model.
  • #1
selfAdjoint
Staff Emeritus
Gold Member
Dearly Missed
6,894
11
Two interesting papers by Chan and Tsou on the hep-th arxiv:

hep-ph/0611363

Title: Higgs Fields as Vielbeins of Internal Symmetry Space
Authors: H.M. Chan, S.T. Tsou
Comments: 24 pages
An earlier suggestion that scalar fields in gauge theory may be introduced as frame vectors or vielbeins in internal symmetry space, and so endowed with geometric significance, is here sharpened and refined. Applied to a $u(1) \times su(2)$ theory this gives exactly the Higgs structure of the standard electroweak theory. Applied to an $su(3)$ theory, it gives a structure having much in common with a phenomenological model previously constructed to explain fermion mixing and mass hierarchy. The difference in physical outcome for the two theories is here traced to the difference in structure between the two symmetry groups.


hep-ph/0611364

Title: A Model Behind the Standard Model
Authors: H.M. Chan, S.T. Tsou
Comments: 62 pages
In spite of its many successes, the Standard Model makes many empirical assumptions in the Higgs and fermion sectors for which a deeper theoretical basis is sought. Starting from the usual gauge symmetry $u(1) \times su(2) \times su(3)$ plus the 3 assumptions: (A) scalar fields as vielbeins in internal symmetry space, (B) the ``confinement picture'' of symmetry breaking, (C) generations as ``dual'' to colour, we are led to a scheme which offers: (I) a geometrical significance to scalar fields, (II) a theoretical criterion on what scalar fields are to be introduced, (III) a partial explanation of why $su(2)$ appears broken while $su(3)$ confines, (IV) baryon-lepton number (B - L) conservation, (V) the standard electroweak structure, (VI) a 3-valued generation index for leptons and quarks, and (VII) a dynamical system with all the essential features of an earlier phenomenological model which gave a good description of the known mass and mixing patterns of quarks and leptons including neutrino oscillations. There are other implications the consistency of which with experiment, however, has not yet been systematically explored.

Any comments?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
These papers by Chan and Tsou are really interesting! They make some bold suggestions about the structure of the Standard Model and propose a model to explain the mass and mixing patterns of quarks and leptons. It will be interesting to see if their ideas are supported by further experiments in the future.
 
  • #3


These two papers offer an interesting and potentially promising approach to understanding the Higgs and fermion sectors of the Standard Model. By introducing scalar fields as vielbeins in internal symmetry space, the authors are able to provide a geometrical significance to these fields and offer a theoretical criterion for their introduction. This approach also leads to the prediction of baryon-lepton number conservation and the standard electroweak structure.

Furthermore, the incorporation of the "confinement picture" and the "dual" nature of generations sheds light on the differences between the breaking of $su(2)$ and the confinement of $su(3)$, which is a key question in understanding the structure of the Standard Model.

The potential explanation for the mass and mixing patterns of quarks and leptons, including neutrino oscillations, is also intriguing. However, as the authors themselves acknowledge, the consistency of these implications with experiment has not yet been systematically explored.

Overall, these papers present a promising model that could potentially provide a deeper theoretical basis for the Standard Model. Further exploration and testing of its predictions will be necessary to fully evaluate its validity.
 

Related to A model behind the Standard Model?

What is the Standard Model?

The Standard Model is a theory in particle physics that describes the fundamental building blocks of matter and their interactions through the four fundamental forces (electromagnetism, strong nuclear force, weak nuclear force, and gravity).

What are the limitations of the Standard Model?

While the Standard Model has been incredibly successful in predicting and explaining many phenomena in particle physics, it has some limitations. It does not include gravity, does not explain dark matter or dark energy, and does not account for the unequal amounts of matter and antimatter in the universe.

What is a model behind the Standard Model?

A model behind the Standard Model is a theoretical framework that extends or modifies the Standard Model in order to address its limitations and provide a more complete understanding of the fundamental particles and forces in the universe.

What is the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and how does it relate to the search for a model behind the Standard Model?

The LHC is a large particle accelerator located at CERN in Switzerland. It is used to collide particles at high energies in order to study the fundamental particles and forces predicted by the Standard Model. The LHC is also used to search for new particles and interactions that may provide evidence for a model behind the Standard Model.

What are some proposed models behind the Standard Model?

There are many proposed models that aim to extend or modify the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry, extra dimensions, and grand unified theories. These models attempt to address the limitations of the Standard Model and provide a more complete understanding of the fundamental particles and forces in the universe.

Similar threads

  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
2
Views
3K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
3
Views
17K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Beyond the Standard Models
Replies
27
Views
7K
Replies
6
Views
1K
Back
Top