About the uneven sharing of charges

  • Thread starter lingling
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Charges
In summary, the charge sharing process is comparable to charging a capacitor. Larger capacitors have the ability to store more charge at the same voltage compared to smaller capacitors. When pushing charge onto a conductor, energy is involved and results in an increase in potential difference. As a result, the charge will redistribute between the two conductors until they are both at the same potential. This means that the conductor with a smaller surface area or sharper curvature will have less charge compared to the larger one to reach the same potential difference.
  • #1
lingling
22
0
Can anyone explain why in the charge sharing processes, more charges are given to the larger conductors made of the same material?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
The process is similar to charging up a capacitor. Larger capacitors can store more charge for the same voltage than smaller capacitors. Energy is involved in pushing charge onto a conductor. In this process work is done which manifest as a raised potential difference (with respect to ground say) over the conductor. What happens therefore is that the charge will redistribute between the two conductors until they are both at the same potential. The conductor with the smaller surface area (or sharper curvature) will therefore take on less charge than the larger one to get to the same potential difference.
 
  • #3


The uneven sharing of charges in conductors is a result of the distribution of electrons within the material. In conductors, electrons are free to move and redistribute themselves in response to an external electric field. This redistribution of electrons leads to the accumulation of charges on the surface of the conductor.

In larger conductors, there is a greater number of available electrons compared to smaller conductors, which allows for a larger accumulation of charges on the surface. This is due to the fact that the total number of electrons in a material is proportional to its volume, and larger conductors have a larger volume.

Additionally, the shape and surface area of a conductor can also affect the distribution of charges. Conductors with a larger surface area have more space for electrons to accumulate, resulting in a higher charge density on the surface.

In summary, the uneven sharing of charges in conductors is a natural consequence of the properties of the material and its size and shape. This phenomenon is well understood and can be explained through the principles of electrostatics and the behavior of electrons in conductors.
 

Related to About the uneven sharing of charges

1. What is the uneven sharing of charges?

The uneven sharing of charges, also known as ionic bonding, is a type of chemical bonding where there is a transfer of electrons from one atom to another. This results in the formation of ions with opposite charges, which then attract each other and form a bond.

2. How does the uneven sharing of charges affect the properties of a molecule?

The uneven sharing of charges creates strong electrostatic forces between the ions, making the resulting molecule very stable and rigid. This leads to high melting and boiling points, as well as brittle and non-conductive properties in solid form.

3. What types of elements are likely to exhibit uneven sharing of charges?

Elements with large differences in electronegativity, such as metals and non-metals, are likely to exhibit uneven sharing of charges. This is because the non-metal atoms have a stronger attraction for electrons, causing them to gain electrons from the metal atoms.

4. How is the uneven sharing of charges different from covalent bonding?

In covalent bonding, electrons are shared between atoms, resulting in a more equal sharing of charges. This leads to molecules with lower melting and boiling points, as well as more flexible and conductive properties. In ionic bonding, there is a complete transfer of electrons, resulting in ions with opposite charges.

5. What are some real-life examples of the uneven sharing of charges?

Common examples of the uneven sharing of charges include table salt (NaCl), which is made up of sodium and chlorine ions, and calcium carbonate (CaCO3), found in seashells and limestone. These compounds have strong ionic bonds that give them their characteristic properties.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
17
Views
499
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
17
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
21
Views
714
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
147
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
488
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
26
Views
680
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
16
Views
936
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
14
Views
672
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
731
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
1K
Back
Top