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Acid-Base Reaction with Acetic Acid and Ammonia

  1. Sep 28, 2008 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    I am trying to determine the products of the equation

    CH3CO2H(aq) + NH3


    2. Relevant equations
    Acid Base reaction

    3. The attempt at a solution
    I know that this is an acid-base reaction so I assumed it would form a salt (acetate) and water but that doesn't account for nitrogen, and if i do account for acetate (CH3CO2NH4, then there is no water. I am just wondering which method/equation is correct.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks! :smile:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 28, 2008 #2

    Ygggdrasil

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    You are correct. There is no water formed in this acid base reaction. This is because ammonia is not a classical Arrhenius base. Water will be formed only when the base contains an OH ion.

    (note: you can make this into an equation that is more understandable in terms of Arrhenius acid/base theory if you consider the reaction of ammonia with water:

    NH3 + H2O --> NH4OH

    So the reaction becomes:

    CH3COOH + NH4OH --> CH3COONH4 + H2O)
     
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