1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Acquiring credentials non-academically

  1. Nov 21, 2008 #1
    Question: I plan on getting an M.S. in physics en route to a PhD at a more prestigious institution, so that I'll be trained hard enough to solve the superconductivity problem. I will have my M.S., and that's all well and good...but I also understand PUBLISHING is essential to beefing up a resume/application.

    Suppose I have my M.S., how do I publish and do work in physics so that I can accumulate credentials? In fact, how do I gain access to good enough instrumentation to accomplish this? Especially since my M.S. will already be earned, and I won't be yet-affiliated with any academic institution?

    The reason I ask: I want to be a theorist, and I think the competition in that field is fierce, and you need to have high credentials (e.g., PhD from UIUC, MIT, etc.) to garner tenure at even a decent university.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 21, 2008 #2

    Andy Resnick

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    I think what bothers me about this post is the underlying assumption that having scientific credentials is somehow divorced from scientific content.
     
  4. Nov 21, 2008 #3

    Choppy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    I think there's a few misunderstandings as well.

    Generally, you publish based on the work you do in your master's and Ph.D. programs. If you're lucky, you might see a publication out of some work you do on a senior undergraduate project or summer project (but this is certainly an exception rather than a rule).

    Doing publishable research outside of an academic or industrial setting (ie. independently) can be extremely difficult. In general you are admitted to a PhD program based on your performance in the master's program and in your undergraduate work.

    Also, don't put too much faith in a university name.
     
  5. Nov 21, 2008 #4
    Suppose I have my M.S., how do I publish and do work in physics so that I can accumulate credentials? In fact, how do I gain access to good enough instrumentation to accomplish this? Especially since my M.S. will already be earned, and I won't be yet-affiliated with any academic institution?

    Why didn't you do publishable research during your hypothetical masters? Seriously, you're getting ahead of yourself.

    Also, while pedigree does matter quite a bit in theoretical work, it's certainly not the end all - that's a very damaging attitude to have. (A Ph.D. from Harvard will probably beat out a superior scientist from Big State University, all else being equal... but all else is rarely equal, and a letter to the hiring committee from a respected colleague is worth it's weight in degrees from MIT.)
     
  6. Nov 22, 2008 #5
    Okay, that kind of takes the pressure off of me. If it's true what you say, then I don't need a big-name university PhD to put together a competitive CV to teach and research at the institution of my choice. Actually, MIT etc. would be nice to get into, but I don't think I am cut out for places like that...though, I would "make myself cut out for them" if I needed to in order to pursue my dream-job of being a professor. We shall see...

    BJN
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Acquiring credentials non-academically
Loading...