Another language question - where do you run from the world?

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In summary, the conversation discusses a Polish saying "to move to Bieszczady Mountains" which means relocating to a simpler life away from the city. The conversation explores if there is an English idiom that carries a similar meaning, with suggestions such as "step out of the rat race", "move somewhere away from it all", or "move to the country to grow radishes". Other idioms mentioned include "on the lam", "goin' up the country", and "off the grid". The conversation also mentions phrases like "bought the farm" and "get out of Dodge" as American expressions with similar connotations. Ultimately, it is concluded that there is no direct English equivalent to the Polish saying
  • #1

Borek

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In Polish we have a saying "to move to Bieszczady Mountains". While technically it means just relocating to a beautiful part of Poland, it is usually used in the context of running away from the civilization, hiding from problems related to corporate or academia work, moving to a place where life is simple and revolves about basic things.

Is there an English idiom that would mean more or less the same? We can translate it as just "move to countryside", but I don't think it will carry the additional meaning.
 
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  • #2
I thought such a place were Kalamazoo. But I'm not sure which meaning it transports. maybe just an impossible place.
 
  • #3
I don't think we move anywhere specific. I think we "step out of the rat race", "move somewhere away from it all", or "move somewhere for a quiet life". You could probably say to "move to the country to grow radishes" (or other vegetable of choice). I'm not sure that's a particular idiom, but it would be understood.
 
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  • #4
Borek said:
In Polish we have a saying "to move to Bieszczady Mountains". While technically it means just relocating to a beautiful part of Poland, it is usually used in the context of running away from the civilization, hiding from problems related to corporate or academia work, moving to a place where life is simple and revolves about basic things.

Is there an English idiom that would mean more or less the same? We can translate it as just "move to countryside", but I don't think it will carry the additional meaning.
If you want to emphasise leaving the corporate world, then "to quit the rate race". But, you can quit the rat race without leaving London. That's what I did! If you want to emphasise moving as far away from the big city as possible, then "to move to the Outer Hebrides" might do.
 
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  • #5
going off the grid

dropping out

on the lam

goin' up the country

These are maybe not quite the same as your "move to Bieszczady Mountains"
 
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  • #6
Oh, we also say "bought the farm" but that's not what you're looking for. It means you have died.
 
  • #7
gmax137 said:
on the lam
That means fleeing lawful imprisonment, at least where I'm from.
gmax137 said:
goin' up the country
Isn't that also a euphemism for death? Or is that just Apocalypse Now?
 
  • #8
gmax137 said:
going off the grid

dropping out

on the lam

goin' up the country

These are maybe not quite the same as your "move to Bieszczady Mountains"
That first one might be gaining in popularity of expression. Going "off the grid".
 
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  • #9
Somehow I am reminded of an old Polish proverb: " When your sleigh is being chased by wolves, throw them a raisin cookie -- but don't stop to bake a cake."
 
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  • #10
gmax137 said:
on the lam
Ibix said:
That means fleeing lawful imprisonment, at least where I'm from.
Yes, me too. That was a bad example for @Borek

goin' up the country

Isn't that also a euphemism for death? Or is that just Apocalypse Now?

I never heard it that way, to me it is Canned Heat at Woodstock, their version of "got to get back to the land" type thing.
 
  • #11
"Move to a desert island" was somewhat common here in the USA for a while. (Haven't heard it lately.)
With the understanding that it is rather small and with limited, if any, communication to the outside world.

(Don't know about a food supply though, might be a short-lived err permanent solution!) :))
 
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  • #12
Yes "go and live on a desert island" also came to my mind. But it's just a manner of speaking that might start with "might as well go and...", not about something you'd really do.
 
  • #13
Borek said:
...moving to a place where life is simple and revolves about basic things.

Is there an English idiom that would mean more or less the same? We can translate it as just "move to countryside", but I don't think it will carry the additional meaning.

I think you hit on the most common expressions I've observed - people "move out to the country" to "live a simple life" - there's no real idiom that I know of.
 
  • #14
Though I will say that Alaska tends to be a place people come to a lot, running from problems/society.
 
  • #15
In Australia, “opting out” is a retreat from the complexity of life.

A “sea change” is usually a physical move from the city to a quieter life.
 
  • #16
Thanks for the help :smile:

We decided to start with "I am the only person who went off the grid and run to Bieszczady Mountains without relocating" (she has completely changed her lifestyle, but lives in the same place) and then to refer to Bieszczady each time the subject is brought back again. Some Polish accents are necessary.
 
  • #17
Borek said:
Thanks for the help :smile:

We decided to start with "I am the only person who went off the grid and run to Bieszczady Mountains without relocating" (she has completely changed her lifestyle, but lives in the same place) and then to refer to Bieszczady each time the subject is brought back again. Some Polish accents are necessary.
If you don't my saying, that should be "ran". Also, in English there would be "the" before Bieszczady Mountains. Missing it out gives it an Eastern European flavour.
 
  • #18
Thanks.

That's just my recapitulation of what we decided, before the text being actually implemented by the girl who does the translation, she corrects my errors all the time o0)

Still, we have a lot of fun doing the work and iterating over the text (see here). I already find it much better than I hoped for.
 
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  • #19
Sounds like it is synonimous with relocating to "the boonies" or "the sticks"... more often than not any more specific
 
  • #20
And for the folks in these very troubled cities in the U. S. It would be: Time to get out of Dodge.
 
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  • #21
morrobay said:
Time to get out of Dodge.

Ah I had forgotten about this one, though I'm not sure if it's really about moving away - more just taking a trip until the heat settles down. This is usually an action movie trope, like you need to leave quickly because you just upset a mob boss. Usually it's not a permanent absence.
 
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  • #22
Pythagorean said:
you just upset a mob boss. Usually it's not a permanent absence.
Now there is somebody that didn't grow up in a Mob town, or even a neighborhood with a well developed gang presence!
 
  • #23
If you live in New Jersey, you go 'down the shore.' This can mean literally a vacation on the Jersey Shore, or just a break from your day to day stress or routine. If you live in New York, someone might be said to 'be upstate' which means he is serving time in prison.

A now little used, commercially inspired, bit of cultural ephemera from the 1970s (derived from then current radio and TV ads for Shaefer Beer): If something goes particularly well, especially with unexpected luck or good fortune, one could be said to be in 'Shaefer City.' e.g. "If this deal works out, we will be in Shaefer City."

--diogenesNY
 
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  • #24
Schaefer is the one beer to have when you're having more than one.
 
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  • #25
Vanadium 50 said:
Schaefer is the one beer to have when you're having more than one.
From Beeradvocate?
https://www.beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/442/1318/

Some more comments on Schaefer:

"It tastes like "BEER"."

"My cheap brother in law keeps a few six packs in the garage fridge, . . . "

How many beers currently on the market have as much history as Schaefer? Unfortunately, that rich history led to it being brewed by Pabst, ripping it from the Brooklyn beer scene. Still, some brands acquired by Pabst (e.g. Ballantine) remain impressive (at least for their price), so I'm optimistic going in.

A 12 pack cost me $10.49 plus tax and deposit at a beer distributor in NYC. The box is pretty nondescript, relying on its now diluted brand instead of playing up the retro vibe. Still, there's an old-timey straightforwardness to the (lack of) marketing that endears me to it, evoking a sort of "your grandfather's brand" vibe.

Dull and sad in appearance, lacking any vibrance or life. But it's filtered and yeast-free.

It's inoffensive in terms of taste, but that requires you to get past the syrupy sticky mouthfeel (which is a tall order).

"Schaefer Beer is an old, old lager. If you are on a budget, then this might be the beer for you. Schaefer's is cheap, which if you are living in the NYC area, finding a bargain is a treat."

"Another high school and college era beer. Was never the first, second or even third choice. But it was readily available and cheap. Again, not the worst I've drank, but easily closer to the bottom than the top."
 
  • #26
Fleeing: "Head for the hills", "Get the hell out of Dodge"

More pleasant escape: seek "greener pastures",
 
  • #27
diogenesNY said:
If you live in New York, someone might be said to 'be upstate' which means he is serving time in prison.
Apparently, 'up the river' meant going to Sing Sing prison in Ossining. Upstate for many New Yorkers means being north of the Bronx or Yonkers, to others, north of Westchester County, and still for others, upper Hudson Valley.

For me, it would be 'head to the mountains', or Wyoming, Montana, or Alaska.
 
  • #28
Is/was there an actual town named "Podunk"?
 
  • #29
Stephen Tashi said:
Is/was there an actual town named "Podunk"?
I found a reference to a 'hypothetical' insignificant place. NPR has an article on "Some 'Podunk' Town In The Middle Of Nowhere."
https://www.npr.org/sections/codesw...703/some-podunk-town-in-the-middle-of-nowhere
According to the NPR article, "There's a Podunk in Connecticut, one in New York, Vermont, Massachusetts." However, it's not clear that any are incorporated.

I've recently visited a number of small towns and unincorporated areas. Some were never significant (populations of less than 50), but some were larger but have since declined in population, sometimes when a large mill or other industrial operation ceased operation, e.g., closure of a lumber mill, cement plant or mine.
 

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