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Any difference on Satellite location between W135 and W075?

  1. Nov 27, 2012 #1
    Referring to following link, it provides satellite location on W135, I would like to know what difference on Satellite location between W135 and W075, how does its measurement affect the Earth differently.

    Does anyone have any suggestions?
    Thanks in advance for any suggestions

    http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/ftpdir/lists/xray/Gp_xr_5m.txt [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 27, 2012 #2
    What sort of difference would you expect? That list of datapoints is measuring solar x-ray intensity, position above the earth is not going to matter. The GOES satellites are all in geostationary orbit, so with instruments looking at earth, the difference is going to be what's below them.
     
  4. Nov 28, 2012 #3
    What W135 represents in location?
    Do you have any suggestions on what location is difference between W135 and W075?

    Thanks you very much for any suggestions
     
  5. Nov 28, 2012 #4
    Lines of Longitude. W135 is over the earth in geostationary orbit at 135deg west, over the pacific about halfway between mexico and hawaii. W075 is at 75deg west, roughly over NYC.

    edit: that's how far west.. the satellites are directly over the equator.
     
  6. Nov 28, 2012 #5
    Does it mean that?

    If there are many Protons charges at W135, but there is no Protons charges at W075, does it mean that the plasma is flowing over the region between mexico and hawaii, and will never flow over NYC, since earth is moving from west to east direction.

    On the other hands,
    If there are many Protons charges at W075, but there is no Protons charges at W135, does it mean that the plasma is flowing over the region between NYC, and will flow over the region between mexico and hawaii next, since earth is moving from west to east direction.

    Am I on the right track?

    Thanks everyone very much for any suggestions
     
  7. Nov 28, 2012 #6
    The particle detector is seeing things trapped in the magnetic field I think.

    The file you linked to is the x-ray detector (not the particle detector), and so (obviously) there is no "flow" since it's just radiation. Differences in the particle detector probably come from the shape of earths magnetic field at different times of day due to the solar wind. If that's the case then yes, if you saw high values at 075 I would expect the values to rise at 135 later in the day.. but again, I'm no GOES sensor expert.
     
  8. Nov 28, 2012 #7

    D H

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    It means just that. The "G" in GOES stands for geostationary.

    No.

    The primary purpose of the GOES satellites is to take pictures of the Earth in a number of frequencies. Having the satellites in geostationary orbits means that each is always looking at the same portion the Earth. This is extremely useful for looking down at the Earth. It's not so useful for looking up into space. There are only a few upward-looking instruments on the GOES satellites, and these aren't imagery sensors.

    The space weather sensors are amongst these non-imagery, non-earth viewing sensors. Some aren't on all of the GOES satellites. The X ray flux you referenced in the opening post is one of those. Others are replicated, but only one satellite is used as the primary source. The data from the secondary is not used for analysis. It's only there for backup, in case the primary fails.
     
  9. Nov 28, 2012 #8
    Thanks everyone very much for suggestions
     
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