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Are art and science bad friends?

  1. Dec 14, 2016 #1
    i love to do creative things thats why i love science i love to ask myself questions and try to answer

    i also love to paint and sculpt, i love to try to capture thos microexprexions that render the soul of a person, here some of my work, what do you think?

    IMG_20160429_201414_zpsujjnfmd0.jpg

    201604292038_0001-2_zpsauvzbmay.jpg

    201604292038_0001-1_zpsb6joml8h.jpg

    marty_zpsmudr6voz.jpe

    Sin%20ttulo18_zps8yyhfpbl.jpe
    Sin%20ttulo16_zpsiebxxszu.jpe

    paul_zpsnqxvfhtp.jpe

    Sin%20ttulo8_zpseqibdj7t.jpe
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 14, 2016 #2
    Awesome! You are definitely an artist. Don't know about arts and science being bad friends. They usually couple those two together in colleges.
     
  4. Dec 14, 2016 #3
    nice drawings, i like number 5 and 3 best. regarding art and science not being friends? well i have always had an interest in science, but never managed to spend the time studying / learning the language of science (math). my life has been quite sporadic, living in several countries and having to force "restart" my life several times. so i naturally found my way to art, where i could not only experiment with new things, but also as a means of expressing myself and connecting with this world. currently i make my own visual films to go with my techno/house music mixes (for berlin style clubs), and there is a lot of science that i play with there (fractals from video feedback, polarizering filters showing colours (stress points) of plastic being backlit by an lcd screen, creating various diffraction patterns from coloured lasers, etc). science is a boundary to the medium of art, while art can be pretty much "anything".
     
  5. Dec 14, 2016 #4
    I have to say those are pretty nice, the fourth drawing from the top looks like the guy is thinking "why is this happening" lol
     
  6. Dec 14, 2016 #5

    BillTre

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    I think I wish I could draw as well as you!

    Personally, I think of art as a communication tool. It could be friendly to science if used for good and unfriendly if not.
     
  7. Dec 14, 2016 #6
    I think they work well together. Art is about creativity, science is about creative problem solving. A lot of great scientists were also artists, in the olden days, certain fields required it. Take a look at Galileo's drawings of the moon, DeVinci's drawings of human anatomy... the amount of detail and precision is unreal for the time.

    Here's one of mine
    https://scontent.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/12994532_10100809105917536_5437147564429747724_n.jpg?oh=41207254d3579831511412c19b878b37&oe=58E872FB
     
  8. Dec 14, 2016 #7

    Krylov

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    In particular I like the colours a lot, there are so many "greens". What kind of technique did you use? As a layman I cannot see this from the photograph.
     
  9. Dec 14, 2016 #8
    I paint by doing a base layer in my "black" which I think in this picture was actually Prussian blue. I draw all the major shapes with it. Then I used extremely thin paint to make many layers of semi-opaque paint. I place a piece of cardboard behind my canvas to soak up extra thinner so that the ultra thin paint doesn't erase what's already there. I did this one as a study in how to make subtle hues with a minimal palette. I think there is Prussian blue, sap green, cadmium yellow, and titanium white in there and nothing else.
     
  10. Dec 15, 2016 #9

    Ryan_m_b

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    Staff: Mentor

    Art and science aren't counterpoints to one another. It's perfectly possible and common to find scientists with artistic talent and artists with scientific hobbies. Often the two will meet, like when artists are inspired by the latest scientific/technological developments. Going the other way the simple skills of creating engaging and informative illustrations for papers is a great talent for a scientist to have IMO.
     
  11. Dec 15, 2016 #10
    Some of most creative people I've ever met in academia were in the physics and math departments. Some of the most unimaginative and dull have been in the arts and music departments. At our annual math department picnic you usually see at least 2 guitars show up.
     
  12. Dec 18, 2016 #11
    I know a lot of people who do artistic as well as science. I'm a PhD student in physics and I like to play music and I do art in various mediums. Below is a drawing of my friend's electric guitar and he is a PhD student in astronomy. I also know a lot of people in my department who play music. I also have a friend who works in making films and he knows quite a bit of science. Richard Feynman also did quite a bit of art.

    electric guitar.jpg
     
  13. Dec 19, 2016 #12
  14. Dec 21, 2016 #13
    I like poetry as an art form, and I've writren a few about physics. Here's one of mine:

    Strings


    The fabric of spacetime is woven from string
    Tiny vibrations from which particles spring
    John was right for in the beginning
    The Word is the sound of the Cosmos singing

    His divine energy is the source
    Of the fundamental force
    Which in a matter of course
    Gives rise to all four

    Gravity strong electric and weak
    Unified forces physicists seek
    General relativity explains gravity
    Quantum mechanics the other three

    Strings are the things
    That unite all four
    Into a cosmic symphony
     
  15. Jan 9, 2017 #14
    i did this:

    toro.jpg
     
  16. Feb 4, 2017 #15
    i think art and science its the very same thing its just the fanatics who harm science holding dogmatic positions no open to discussion, like these guys:

    _81577467_buddhas_pair.jpg

    to make my point stronger and so you realize your no different than them i took the liberty in the last two hours to make these original pieces that ill be only be posting here making sure that if a dishonest action is taken them theyre forever lost to mankind

    the infinite room:

    IMG_20170205_033847_zpsccv3xme4.jpg

    and reaching forever and ever:

    IMG_20170205_034020_zpsxn2oqtz4.jpg
     
  17. Feb 4, 2017 #16

    symbolipoint

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    Art and Science are certainly not bad friends to each other.

    Leonardo Da Vinci!
    A statement or discussion from Neil De Grasse Tyson about his experience when studying Art! (Try an internet search).
    Some use of Perspective in the History of drawing-painting!
    The usefulness of Timing in music!

    EDIT: Rewording for clarity
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2017
  18. Feb 5, 2017 #17
    thanks for the heads up , ill be checking that :)

    check this pic and tell me if your brain doesnt make click, like is the matrix?



    Vanishing_Venice_-_Patrick_Hughes.jpg

    IMG_20170205_233017_zpscpidp9rl.jpg
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2017
  19. Feb 6, 2017 #18
    can you explain reaching forever and ever? I don't understand it, thanks
     
  20. Feb 21, 2017 #19

    BillTre

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    Here is a brief article on Ramón y Cajal's neurobiological drawings and how they helped establish neurons as important functional units in the nervous system.
     
  21. Feb 27, 2017 #20

    BillTre

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    Here is the annual Biotechniques song contest (biologists rather than physicists (come on guys make a song contest!)) of mostly parodies of songs with science lyrics.

    I like this one best.
     
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