Are hydraulics the strongest way to move a robot's legs?

  • Thread starter TheCurious
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In summary, hydraulic robots are better suited for heavy loads and are not as fast as electrical robots.
  • #1
hi, in the hypothetical, if you had a robot with a large leg (like a mech), would hydraulics be the only way to move the leg like muscles do? what about electric cylinders? Thank you.
 
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  • #2
ABB robotics makes robotic arms controlled by electric motors. Quickly scanning their website, I saw that their largest robotic arm can support about 500kg.

Exavators on constructon sites can support weights many times that and they use hydraulics.
 
  • #3
As far as I know, from an efficiency and leverage standpoint it's better to use hydraulics. However in the case of a robot I would fancy using other smaller devices depending on what it is to be used for and how much load it has to lift. I don't know about moving like muscles do, but I imagine much of that can done by programming specific behaviors even if the device you use moves much too abruptly or in an inhuman fashion.
 
  • #4
Would a electrical linear actuator help in your case? It uses a power screw to drive the piston.
 
  • #5
To TheCurious;

Using hydraulic to run the robotic legs isn't a solution. Hydraulic need reservoir, compressor, etc... will be very costly for components and also fluid maintenance. Hydraulic robot normally used for industrial due to very heavy loads. My personal experience to run a robot definitely will be electrical. Like what you mention, "electrical cylinder". The limitation of electrical cylinder its hardly carry heavy loads.

Another consideration is the speed. You must clearly understand the speed vs torque graph. If you really want to consider hydualic, I am very sure your robot will be extremely slow.

Because of this reason, pneumatic is a best solution. For me, I will determine the weight of the robot without load (stability) and with load handling and pre-determine whether run by electrical or pneumatic. Calculation must be carry out from its mechanism to respect to the motor and to another parts such as the stress & strain calculation of the cylinders.
 
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  • #7
I'm always a bit leery about pneumatics for heavy applications because of the 'bounce' factor resultant of the air being able to be compressed within the cylinder. You don't have that problem with hydraulics because of the fluid being essentially incompressible. There are some very fast-acting systems available, including proportional solenoid valves.
If this is strictly theoretical, or on an unlimited budget, you can also investigate artificial muscles that are in development. So far, they're fairly small and very expensive, but the potential looks very good.
 
  • #8
This is just a suggestion, but I know that modern robotics often uses a liquid which changes it viscosity when a current passes through it (can't remember the name for that fluid) to act as muscles for the robots, I think that would be the ideal option in this case as this is a liquid, so it is incompressible, and there is a relationship between its viscosity to the current applied to it for accurate movements. And all you need is the liquid and a battery and a regulator to make it work. Hope this helps.
 

1. What are hydraulics?

Hydraulics is a branch of science and engineering that deals with the mechanical properties of fluids, particularly in relation to the behavior of liquids in motion.

2. How do hydraulics work in a robot's legs?

Hydraulic systems use pressurized fluids to transfer force and motion. In a robot's legs, hydraulic cylinders are used to generate movement by converting fluid pressure into linear motion.

3. What makes hydraulics a strong way to move a robot's legs?

Hydraulic systems are known for their high power density, meaning they can generate a large amount of force in a small space. This makes them an ideal choice for creating strong and efficient movement in a robot's legs.

4. Are there any disadvantages to using hydraulics in a robot's legs?

While hydraulics can provide great strength and power, they also have some drawbacks. They can be expensive to install and maintain, and they require a certain level of expertise to design and operate properly.

5. Are there other methods besides hydraulics for moving a robot's legs?

Yes, there are many different ways to create movement in a robot's legs. Some other common methods include electric motors, pneumatic systems, and mechanical linkages. Each method has its own advantages and limitations, and the best choice will depend on the specific needs and design of the robot.

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