1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Are lowest/irreducible fraction forms unique?

  1. Apr 26, 2010 #1
    I thought they were unique, but given a fraction a/b, couldn't you always write it as the (decimal representation of a/b without the decimal place)/ 10^(n) ?
    thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 26, 2010 #2

    Hurkyl

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Every rational number does indeed have a unique representation of the form a/b, where a is an integer and b is a positive integer.

    If what you suggest both makes sense and results in something that is in lowest terms, then you have merely recomputed the form a/b.
     
  4. Apr 26, 2010 #3
    thanks, but for example, you can write 121/123 = 0.983739837398373983739837398373983739837398373983739837398373983739837398373983739837398373983739837398373983739837398373983739837398373983739837398374
    .....
    or you can write (n being the number of digits)
    983739837398373983739837398373983739837398373983739837398373983739837398373983739837398373983739837398373983739837398373983739837398373983739837398374 / 10^(n)

    these are both in lowest forms right? but they have different integers a, b for a/b
    and I'm curious, I've never seen a proof for that statement
     
  5. Apr 26, 2010 #4

    Hurkyl

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Erm... exactly how many digits do you think are in the decimal expansion of 121/123?
     
  6. Apr 26, 2010 #5
    Well, a lot.. But the problem is that I can't find an example where the number of digits is finite. But if I could, you could apply the same idea?
     
  7. Apr 26, 2010 #6

    Hurkyl

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Of course. 1/2 and 127/1000 have only finitely many digits.

    (ignoring the infinitely many trailing zeroes, and assuming you choose that decimal representation rather than the one ending in infinitely many trailing nines)
     
  8. Apr 26, 2010 #7
    D'oh of course, 1/2.. But now in this example, 5/10 is indeed just 1/2.. How can I prove that these irreducible forms are unique? Will it be an easy proof? (I'm guessing that it will be something like supposing you have a' and a then showing that they are equal, a usual strategy)
    thanks
     
  9. Apr 26, 2010 #8

    Hurkyl

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    It follows more or less directly from prime factorization of integers.
     
  10. Apr 27, 2010 #9

    HallsofIvy

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    Well, first only a small portion of the rational numbers have decimal representations that terminate after a finite number of places (those with only powers of 2 and 5 in their denominators) and those are the only ones for which that is possible. And, of course, that would, in general, NOT be irreducible.

    For example, 1/4 = 0.25 so your expression would be 25/100 which is not irreductible because both 25 and 100 are divisible by 25. It reduces to, no surprise, 1/4!
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Are lowest/irreducible fraction forms unique?
  1. A fraction (Replies: 1)

  2. Fraction of a fraction (Replies: 16)

Loading...