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B Are there Hadrons with more than three quarks?

  1. Aug 3, 2017 #1
    As far as I know there are Mesons (quark-Antiquark pair) and Baryons (three quarks). But are there Hadrons which contain more than 3 Quarks?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 3, 2017 #2
    Hi and welcome to PF!
    There has been a lot of hype lately that the LHC discovered penta-quark hadrons but I don't know much about it, other than there are 5 quarks involved.
     
  4. Aug 4, 2017 #3

    A. Neumaier

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    See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentaquark
    It is probably a baryon-meson molecule. Of course there are also dodeca-quarks = alpha-particles, stable bound states of 12 quarks, or of two protons and two neutrons, and heavier nuclei.
     
  5. Aug 4, 2017 #4
    Aight, I'll surely look it up. Thank you very much :) @jerromyjon @A. Neumeier
     
  6. Aug 4, 2017 #5
    In meson-baryon scattering, ## q\bar{q} + qqq##, one typically sees resonances (short-lived particles) only for ##qqq## systems, where one ##q## annihilates with the ##\bar{q}##. States such as ##qqqq\bar{q}## where there is no ##q## able to annihilate the ##\bar{q}## are called exotic and no such resonances have been verified. This is most easily seen in ##K^+p## scattering.
     
  7. Aug 5, 2017 #6
    The only well-known hexaquark is orthodeuteron, and it behaves strongly as a bound system of two separate nucleons.
    Paradeuteron, diproton and dineutron are confirmed to be unbound.
    Are there any other hexaquarks that are bound?
    With 5 quarks participating in baryons, there are a lot of combinations to check...
     
  8. Aug 7, 2017 #7

    mfb

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  9. Aug 8, 2017 #8
    How is a tetraquark verified to be that?
     
  10. Aug 8, 2017 #9

    mfb

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    Z(4430) decays to ## J/\psi \,\pi^\pm##, and based on its mass it cannot have a b quark, so it has to have ##c \bar c## in it. It also has a charge, so it needs at least two more quarks.
     
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