Artificial gravity in a spacecraft

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of artificial gravity and its effects on one's ability to walk in different directions within a rotating space station. The first question asks for the angular velocity needed for a perceived gravity of 10, while the second question explores the possibility of walking from point B to point A, B to D, and C to D. The third and fourth questions focus on the direction of gravity and its relationship to walking, with the final question discussing the potential difficulty of walking with different gravitational relationships. The conversation also includes clarification on the given diagram and the importance of thinking rather than relying on Google for answers.
  • #1
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Member advised to use the formatting template for all homework help requests and to show an attempt at solution.

Homework Statement



https://i.hizliresim.com/Bzp05M.jpg " spacecraft "

Bzp05M.jpg


Now you're in other space.No gravity at all.You 're going to make your own artifical gravity R = 100m
Quest
1-) With which angular velocity, g is equal to 10 (g = 10)
2-)Can you walk from b to a? Why is that
3-)Can you walk from b to d? Why is that
4-)Can you walk from c to d? Why is that

My Solution

a=w^2.r
10=w^2.100
w=0.301 this one first question.
2-3-4 questions
I think The resulting gravity is towards the center.therefore only walking from b to d.But I could not prove

Note:Sorry ! If you have spelling error I don't know English.I use Google
 

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  • #2
According to Physics Forums rules, you need to make an attempt to solve the problem before we can offer help. What are your thoughts on the problem?
 
  • Like
Likes Halit
  • #3
Post removed.
My apologies for posting possible solution before OP made fair attempt at it.
Brain not in gear...
 
  • #4
phyzguy said:
According to Physics Forums rules, you need to make an attempt to solve the problem before we can offer help. What are your thoughts on the problem?
I added.
 
  • #5
Nik_2213 said:
Post removed.
My apologies for posting possible solution before OP made fair attempt at it.
Brain not in gear...
I don't understand you. What u mean ?
 
  • #6
Halit said:
think The resulting gravity is towards the center.therefore only walking from b to d.
Remember, it is not really gravity.. it is just some perceived force that feels like gravity.
If you are inside a rotating drum, what force do you perceive?
How does the direction of gravity relate to one's ability to walk?

With regard to walking from c to d, was the arrow in the diagram given to you or did you add that? Is that the only route?
 
  • #7
haruspex said:
Remember, it is not really gravity.. it is just some perceived force that feels like gravity.
If you are inside a rotating drum, what force do you perceive?
How does the direction of gravity relate to one's ability to walk?

With regard to walking from c to d, was the arrow in the diagram given to you or did you add that? Is that the only route?
Yes, I just need to examine C to D for this rotation.
I think,No because artifical gravity in A.Can only come to A . We can't walking. Am I true ?
 
  • #8
Halit said:
I just need to examine C to D for this rotation.
So what routes should you consider?
Halit said:
artifical gravity in A.Can only come to A .
I have no idea what that means.
Please try to answer this question:
haruspex said:
How does the direction of gravity relate to one's ability to walk?
 
  • #9
haruspex said:
So what routes should you consider?

I have no idea what that means.
Please try to answer this question:
Sorry,I don't know.I do research on google, I can't find
 
  • #10
Halit said:
Sorry,I don't know.I do research on google, I can't find
You don't need Google, you just need to think.
When you walk, what is the direction of gravity in relation to the direction in which you walk?
Would it be difficult to walk with some other relationships?
 
  • #11
haruspex said:
You don't need Google, you just need to think.
When you walk, what is the direction of gravity in relation to the direction in which you walk?
Would it be difficult to walk with some other relationships?
I think that https://i.hizliresim.com/lZaPGX.jpg
 
  • #13
hmm... actually...

If you walked fast enough you could go through a cross corridor, counting on residual velocity to keep you glued to the "floor", both to and from the axis.
 
  • #14
hmmm27 said:
hmm... actually...

If you walked fast enough you could go through a cross corridor, counting on residual velocity to keep you glued to the "floor", both to and from the axis.
Getting started would be the problem.
 
  • #15
haruspex said:
Yes, that answers my first question in post #10. What about the second one?
I understand you ,can you explain a little more in Question 2
 
  • #16
Halit said:
I understand you ,can you explain a little more in Question 2
Can you walk up a wall? Why not?
 
  • #17
I think that , you can just walk from B to D
 
  • #18
Halit said:
I think that , you can just walk from B to D
What about C to B?
 

What is artificial gravity in a spacecraft?

Artificial gravity in a spacecraft is a concept of simulating a gravitational force inside the spacecraft to counteract the weightlessness experienced by astronauts in space.

How is artificial gravity created in a spacecraft?

Artificial gravity in a spacecraft can be created through two main methods: rotation or acceleration. Rotation involves spinning the spacecraft around a central axis, while acceleration involves constantly accelerating the spacecraft in a specific direction.

What are the potential benefits of artificial gravity in a spacecraft?

The main benefit of artificial gravity in a spacecraft is to prevent the negative effects of prolonged weightlessness on the human body, such as muscle atrophy and bone loss. It can also make daily activities, such as eating and exercising, easier for astronauts.

Are there any challenges or limitations to implementing artificial gravity in a spacecraft?

One of the main challenges of implementing artificial gravity in a spacecraft is the cost and technical complexity of building and maintaining a rotating or accelerating spacecraft. Additionally, the creation of artificial gravity may also cause motion sickness in some individuals.

Has artificial gravity been successfully implemented in any spacecrafts?

Yes, artificial gravity has been successfully implemented in several spacecrafts, including the Gemini and Apollo missions. The International Space Station also has a rotating module that simulates artificial gravity for short periods of time.

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